Advanced

Degradation of a textile azo dye using biological treatment followed by photo-Fenton oxidation: Evaluation of toxicity and microbial community structure

Punzi, Marisa LU ; Anbalagan, Anbarasan LU ; Aragao, Rosa LU ; Svensson, Britt-Marie; Jonstrup, Maria LU and Mattiasson, Bo LU (2015) In Chemical Engineering Journal 270. p.290-299
Abstract
Many commercial dye preparations are cocktails of active dyes and various by-products that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and end up in significant amounts in the effluent after the dyeing process. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are not able to degrade such compounds and detoxify the effluent, thus alternative treatments should be developed. In our work we suggest to use photo-Fenton oxidation as post-treatment after an anaerobic biofilm process, in a way to minimize the reagents needed. This process was used for treatment of synthetic textile wastewater containing the commercial azo dyestuff Remazol Red, starch and sodium chloride. The treated textile effluent had COD lower than 18 mg/l even when using initial... (More)
Many commercial dye preparations are cocktails of active dyes and various by-products that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and end up in significant amounts in the effluent after the dyeing process. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are not able to degrade such compounds and detoxify the effluent, thus alternative treatments should be developed. In our work we suggest to use photo-Fenton oxidation as post-treatment after an anaerobic biofilm process, in a way to minimize the reagents needed. This process was used for treatment of synthetic textile wastewater containing the commercial azo dyestuff Remazol Red, starch and sodium chloride. The treated textile effluent had COD lower than 18 mg/l even when using initial Fenton reagents concentration as low as 1 mM ferrous ions and 10 mM hydrogen peroxide. The acute toxicity was higher in the biologically treated than in the untreated effluent. Photo-Fenton oxidation successfully reduced the toxicity and the final effluent was non-toxic to Artemia sauna and Microtox, with the exception of the effluent containing high concentration of sodium chloride, which was moderately toxic to Microtox. For the first time the presence of algae was detected in a reactor treating textile wastewater using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); bacteria and fungi were also abundant. The results of this study suggest that using advanced oxidation after biological treatment is an effective way to degrade the organic compounds and remove toxicity from textile effluents. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Azo dye, Textile wastewater, Biofilm, Photo-Fenton, DGGE, Toxicity
in
Chemical Engineering Journal
volume
270
pages
290 - 299
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000353729100032
  • scopus:84923628137
ISSN
1385-8947
DOI
10.1016/j.cej.2015.02.042
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6efe62ef-6f6b-4a5b-8251-8ee6a6525f80 (old id 7432933)
date added to LUP
2015-06-24 14:06:09
date last changed
2017-10-08 04:00:23
@article{6efe62ef-6f6b-4a5b-8251-8ee6a6525f80,
  abstract     = {Many commercial dye preparations are cocktails of active dyes and various by-products that are recalcitrant to biological degradation and end up in significant amounts in the effluent after the dyeing process. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are not able to degrade such compounds and detoxify the effluent, thus alternative treatments should be developed. In our work we suggest to use photo-Fenton oxidation as post-treatment after an anaerobic biofilm process, in a way to minimize the reagents needed. This process was used for treatment of synthetic textile wastewater containing the commercial azo dyestuff Remazol Red, starch and sodium chloride. The treated textile effluent had COD lower than 18 mg/l even when using initial Fenton reagents concentration as low as 1 mM ferrous ions and 10 mM hydrogen peroxide. The acute toxicity was higher in the biologically treated than in the untreated effluent. Photo-Fenton oxidation successfully reduced the toxicity and the final effluent was non-toxic to Artemia sauna and Microtox, with the exception of the effluent containing high concentration of sodium chloride, which was moderately toxic to Microtox. For the first time the presence of algae was detected in a reactor treating textile wastewater using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); bacteria and fungi were also abundant. The results of this study suggest that using advanced oxidation after biological treatment is an effective way to degrade the organic compounds and remove toxicity from textile effluents. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Punzi, Marisa and Anbalagan, Anbarasan and Aragao, Rosa and Svensson, Britt-Marie and Jonstrup, Maria and Mattiasson, Bo},
  issn         = {1385-8947},
  keyword      = {Azo dye,Textile wastewater,Biofilm,Photo-Fenton,DGGE,Toxicity},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {290--299},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemical Engineering Journal},
  title        = {Degradation of a textile azo dye using biological treatment followed by photo-Fenton oxidation: Evaluation of toxicity and microbial community structure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cej.2015.02.042},
  volume       = {270},
  year         = {2015},
}