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Paediatric ventilation treatment of acute lung injury in Nordic intensive care units

Jensen, L. L.; Baratt-Due, A.; Englund, P. N.; Harju, J. A.; Sigurdsson, Theodor LU and Liberg, J. -P. (2015) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 59(5). p.568-575
Abstract
BackgroundTreatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children is largely based on extrapolated knowledge obtained from adults and which varies between different hospitals. This study explores ventilation treatment strategies for children with ARDS in the Nordic countries, and compares these with international practice. MethodsIn October 2012, a questionnaire covering ventilation treatment strategies for children aged 1 month to 6 years of age with ARDS was sent to 21 large Nordic intensive care units that treat children with ARDS. Pre-terms and children with congenital conditions were excluded. ResultsEighteen of the 21 (86%) targeted intensive care units responded to the questionnaire. Fiftypercent of these facilities were... (More)
BackgroundTreatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children is largely based on extrapolated knowledge obtained from adults and which varies between different hospitals. This study explores ventilation treatment strategies for children with ARDS in the Nordic countries, and compares these with international practice. MethodsIn October 2012, a questionnaire covering ventilation treatment strategies for children aged 1 month to 6 years of age with ARDS was sent to 21 large Nordic intensive care units that treat children with ARDS. Pre-terms and children with congenital conditions were excluded. ResultsEighteen of the 21 (86%) targeted intensive care units responded to the questionnaire. Fiftypercent of these facilities were paediatric intensive care units. Written guidelines existed in 44% of the units. Fiftypercent of the units frequently used cuffed endotracheal tubes. Ventilation was achieved by pressure control for 89% vs. volume control for 11% of units. Bronchodilators were used by all units, whereas steroids usage was 83% and surfactant 39%. Inhaled nitric oxide and high frequency oscillation were available in 94% of the units. Neurally adjusted ventilator assist was used by 44% of the units. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be started in 44% of the units. ConclusionVentilation treatment strategies for paediatric ARDS in the Nordic countries are relatively uniform and largely in accordance with international practice. The use of steroids and surfactant is more frequent than shown in other studies. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
59
issue
5
pages
568 - 575
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000353904400004
  • scopus:84927788789
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/aas.12500
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d75cab65-ea16-41b3-b1a7-884b11bc8883 (old id 7433039)
date added to LUP
2015-07-03 07:11:04
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:33:02
@article{d75cab65-ea16-41b3-b1a7-884b11bc8883,
  abstract     = {BackgroundTreatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children is largely based on extrapolated knowledge obtained from adults and which varies between different hospitals. This study explores ventilation treatment strategies for children with ARDS in the Nordic countries, and compares these with international practice. MethodsIn October 2012, a questionnaire covering ventilation treatment strategies for children aged 1 month to 6 years of age with ARDS was sent to 21 large Nordic intensive care units that treat children with ARDS. Pre-terms and children with congenital conditions were excluded. ResultsEighteen of the 21 (86%) targeted intensive care units responded to the questionnaire. Fiftypercent of these facilities were paediatric intensive care units. Written guidelines existed in 44% of the units. Fiftypercent of the units frequently used cuffed endotracheal tubes. Ventilation was achieved by pressure control for 89% vs. volume control for 11% of units. Bronchodilators were used by all units, whereas steroids usage was 83% and surfactant 39%. Inhaled nitric oxide and high frequency oscillation were available in 94% of the units. Neurally adjusted ventilator assist was used by 44% of the units. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation could be started in 44% of the units. ConclusionVentilation treatment strategies for paediatric ARDS in the Nordic countries are relatively uniform and largely in accordance with international practice. The use of steroids and surfactant is more frequent than shown in other studies.},
  author       = {Jensen, L. L. and Baratt-Due, A. and Englund, P. N. and Harju, J. A. and Sigurdsson, Theodor and Liberg, J. -P.},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {568--575},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Paediatric ventilation treatment of acute lung injury in Nordic intensive care units},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.12500},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {2015},
}