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The classical versus the Cabrera presentation system for resting electrocardiography: Impact on recognition and understanding of clinically important electrocardiographic changes.

Lam, Anny; Wagner, Galen S and Pahlm, Olle LU (2015) In Journal of Electrocardiology 48(4). p.476-482
Abstract
The classical system for presentation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the electrical activity of the heart as viewed in the transverse plane by 6 leads with a single anatomically ordered sequence, V1-V6; but in the frontal plane by 6 leads with dual sequences, I, II, and III, and aVR, aVL, and aVF. However, there is also a single anatomically ordered sequence of leads, called the Cabrera display that presents the six frontal plane leads in their anatomically ordered sequence of: aVL, I, -aVR, II, aVF, and III. Although it has been recognized that the Cabrera system has clinical diagnostic advantages compared to the classical display, it is currently only used in Sweden. The primary explanation of why the Cabrera system has... (More)
The classical system for presentation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the electrical activity of the heart as viewed in the transverse plane by 6 leads with a single anatomically ordered sequence, V1-V6; but in the frontal plane by 6 leads with dual sequences, I, II, and III, and aVR, aVL, and aVF. However, there is also a single anatomically ordered sequence of leads, called the Cabrera display that presents the six frontal plane leads in their anatomically ordered sequence of: aVL, I, -aVR, II, aVF, and III. Although it has been recognized that the Cabrera system has clinical diagnostic advantages compared to the classical display, it is currently only used in Sweden. The primary explanation of why the Cabrera system has not been adopted internationally has been that analog ECG recorders had technical limitations. Currently, however, the classical system is most often seen as a historical remnant that prevails because of conservatism within the cardiology community. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Electrocardiology
volume
48
issue
4
pages
476 - 482
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:26051487
  • wos:000363434100002
  • scopus:84937728356
ISSN
1532-8430
DOI
10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2015.05.011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2b4d2b0b-19da-4187-b2c7-65e81fb570e6 (old id 7487678)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26051487?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-07-07 11:38:33
date last changed
2017-01-15 03:03:24
@article{2b4d2b0b-19da-4187-b2c7-65e81fb570e6,
  abstract     = {The classical system for presentation of the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the electrical activity of the heart as viewed in the transverse plane by 6 leads with a single anatomically ordered sequence, V1-V6; but in the frontal plane by 6 leads with dual sequences, I, II, and III, and aVR, aVL, and aVF. However, there is also a single anatomically ordered sequence of leads, called the Cabrera display that presents the six frontal plane leads in their anatomically ordered sequence of: aVL, I, -aVR, II, aVF, and III. Although it has been recognized that the Cabrera system has clinical diagnostic advantages compared to the classical display, it is currently only used in Sweden. The primary explanation of why the Cabrera system has not been adopted internationally has been that analog ECG recorders had technical limitations. Currently, however, the classical system is most often seen as a historical remnant that prevails because of conservatism within the cardiology community.},
  author       = {Lam, Anny and Wagner, Galen S and Pahlm, Olle},
  issn         = {1532-8430},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {476--482},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Electrocardiology},
  title        = {The classical versus the Cabrera presentation system for resting electrocardiography: Impact on recognition and understanding of clinically important electrocardiographic changes.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2015.05.011},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2015},
}