Advanced

Temporal evolution of biochar’s impact on soil nitrogen processes - a 15N tracing study

Nelissen, Victoria; Rütting, Tobias; Huygens, Dries; Ruysschaert, G and Boeckx, Pascal (2014) In Global Change Biology Bioenergy Epub ahead of print.
Abstract
Biochar addition to soils has been proposed as a means to increase soil fertility and carbon sequestration. However, its effect on soil nitrogen (N) cycling and N availability is poorly understood. To gain better insight into the temporal variability of the impact of biochar on gross soil N dynamics, two 15N tracing experiments, in combination with numerical data analysis, were conducted with soil from a biochar field trial, 1 day and 1 year after application of a woody biochar type. The results showed accelerated soil N cycling immediately following biochar addition, with increased gross N mineralization (+34%), nitrification (+13%) and ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3?) immobilization rates (+4500% and +511%, respectively). One year... (More)
Biochar addition to soils has been proposed as a means to increase soil fertility and carbon sequestration. However, its effect on soil nitrogen (N) cycling and N availability is poorly understood. To gain better insight into the temporal variability of the impact of biochar on gross soil N dynamics, two 15N tracing experiments, in combination with numerical data analysis, were conducted with soil from a biochar field trial, 1 day and 1 year after application of a woody biochar type. The results showed accelerated soil N cycling immediately following biochar addition, with increased gross N mineralization (+34%), nitrification (+13%) and ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3?) immobilization rates (+4500% and +511%, respectively). One year after biochar application, the biochar acted as an inert substance with respect to N cycling. In the short term, biochar's labile C fraction and a pH increase can explain stimulated microbial activity, while in the longer term, when the labile C fraction has been mineralized and the pH effect has faded, the accelerating effect of biochar on N cycling ceases. In conclusion, biochar accelerates soil N transformations in the short-term through stimulating soil microbial activity, thereby increasing N bio-availability. This effect is, however, temporary. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
tracing model, nitrogen, mineralization, immobilization, gross transformation, field trial, 15N, stable isotopes, nitrogen cycle, biochar
in
Global Change Biology Bioenergy
volume
Epub ahead of print
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:84931562293
ISSN
1757-1693
DOI
10.1111/gcbb.12156
project
MERGE
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f3e423cb-f8a1-4f30-bfbf-1ba34b897002 (old id 7515628)
date added to LUP
2014-11-28 12:26:28
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:38:55
@article{f3e423cb-f8a1-4f30-bfbf-1ba34b897002,
  abstract     = {Biochar addition to soils has been proposed as a means to increase soil fertility and carbon sequestration. However, its effect on soil nitrogen (N) cycling and N availability is poorly understood. To gain better insight into the temporal variability of the impact of biochar on gross soil N dynamics, two 15N tracing experiments, in combination with numerical data analysis, were conducted with soil from a biochar field trial, 1 day and 1 year after application of a woody biochar type. The results showed accelerated soil N cycling immediately following biochar addition, with increased gross N mineralization (+34%), nitrification (+13%) and ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3?) immobilization rates (+4500% and +511%, respectively). One year after biochar application, the biochar acted as an inert substance with respect to N cycling. In the short term, biochar's labile C fraction and a pH increase can explain stimulated microbial activity, while in the longer term, when the labile C fraction has been mineralized and the pH effect has faded, the accelerating effect of biochar on N cycling ceases. In conclusion, biochar accelerates soil N transformations in the short-term through stimulating soil microbial activity, thereby increasing N bio-availability. This effect is, however, temporary.},
  author       = {Nelissen, Victoria and Rütting, Tobias and Huygens, Dries and Ruysschaert, G and Boeckx, Pascal},
  issn         = {1757-1693},
  keyword      = {tracing model,nitrogen,mineralization,immobilization,gross transformation,field trial,15N,stable isotopes,nitrogen cycle,biochar},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Global Change Biology Bioenergy},
  title        = {Temporal evolution of biochar’s impact on soil nitrogen processes - a 15N tracing study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12156},
  volume       = {Epub ahead of print},
  year         = {2014},
}