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Two models of metaphoricity and three dilemmas of metaphor research

Sonesson, Göran LU (2019) In Cognitive Semiotics 12(1). p.1-17
Abstract
Starting out from classical metaphor theory, I consider two models, the Overlap model and the Tension model — the difference between which may not have been spelled out in that tradition. Although the latter has an Aristotelian pedigree, it may be less generally valid than the Overlap model, at least if the requirement for tension is placed very high. The metaphors distinguished by Lakoff and Johnson, like the catachresis of classical rhetoric, fulfils the Overlap model, but in a petrified form, as is shown by the fact that both may, in the same way, be awakened from their slumber by some modification or addition to the sentence. What Lakoff and Johnson, later on, call primary metaphors, however, does not really correspond to any of these... (More)
Starting out from classical metaphor theory, I consider two models, the Overlap model and the Tension model — the difference between which may not have been spelled out in that tradition. Although the latter has an Aristotelian pedigree, it may be less generally valid than the Overlap model, at least if the requirement for tension is placed very high. The metaphors distinguished by Lakoff and Johnson, like the catachresis of classical rhetoric, fulfils the Overlap model, but in a petrified form, as is shown by the fact that both may, in the same way, be awakened from their slumber by some modification or addition to the sentence. What Lakoff and Johnson, later on, call primary metaphors, however, does not really correspond to any of these models. They are quite literally extensions of human embodiments. Thus, they are actually diagrams, in the sense in which Peirce opposes them to metaphors. We go on to discuss similarities and differences between verbal and pictorial metaphors, arguing that some metaphorical configurations are more apt to work in pictures and others in language, although there are also some configurations which are common to both. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cognitive Semiotics
volume
12
issue
1
pages
1 - 17
publisher
Peter Lang Publishing Group
ISSN
2235-2066
DOI
10.1515/cogsem-2019-2009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
756b2267-33a5-4cde-8561-29f2f9f8bc29
date added to LUP
2019-06-21 20:17:39
date last changed
2019-08-09 02:19:05
@article{756b2267-33a5-4cde-8561-29f2f9f8bc29,
  abstract     = {Starting out from classical metaphor theory, I consider two models, the Overlap model and the Tension model — the difference between which may not have been spelled out in that tradition. Although the latter has an Aristotelian pedigree, it may be less generally valid than the Overlap model, at least if the requirement for tension is placed very high. The metaphors distinguished by Lakoff and Johnson, like the catachresis of classical rhetoric, fulfils the Overlap model, but in a petrified form, as is shown by the fact that both may, in the same way, be awakened from their slumber by some modification or addition to the sentence. What Lakoff and Johnson, later on, call primary metaphors, however, does not really correspond to any of these models. They are quite literally extensions of human embodiments. Thus, they are actually diagrams, in the sense in which Peirce opposes them to metaphors. We go on to discuss similarities and differences between verbal and pictorial metaphors, arguing that some metaphorical configurations are more apt to work in pictures and others in language, although there are also some configurations which are common to both.},
  author       = {Sonesson, Göran},
  issn         = {2235-2066},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--17},
  publisher    = {Peter Lang Publishing Group},
  series       = {Cognitive Semiotics},
  title        = {Two models of metaphoricity and three dilemmas of metaphor research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cogsem-2019-2009},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2019},
}