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Bryophyte conservation for the future.

Söderström, Lars; Hallingbäck, Tomas; Gustafsson, Lena; Cronberg, Nils LU and Hedenäs, Lars (1992) In Biological Conservation 59(2-3). p.265-270
Abstract
he conservation process involves recognizing and listing rare and decreasing species, recording their distribution, biology and specific threats, proposing conservation programmes, and executing these programmes.



There are large gaps in our knowledge about bryophytes which must be filled before their conservation can be selective. These include taxonomy, bryogeography, habitat demands, natural dynamics, dispersal ability, population structure and genetics.



In a long-term perspective, conservation must strive towards creating possibilities for the species to survive without too much artificial support. It is particularly important to focus on habitats and sites where the species may survive naturally... (More)
he conservation process involves recognizing and listing rare and decreasing species, recording their distribution, biology and specific threats, proposing conservation programmes, and executing these programmes.



There are large gaps in our knowledge about bryophytes which must be filled before their conservation can be selective. These include taxonomy, bryogeography, habitat demands, natural dynamics, dispersal ability, population structure and genetics.



In a long-term perspective, conservation must strive towards creating possibilities for the species to survive without too much artificial support. It is particularly important to focus on habitats and sites where the species may survive naturally during unfavourable periods. In the short term, creating nature reserves with large populations can save a species until our knowledge has increased. In practice, bryologists must be more active in collecting data and informing the conservation organizations and governmental authorities about the need for conservation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biological Conservation
volume
59
issue
2-3
pages
265 - 270
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0026564041
ISSN
1873-2917
DOI
10.1016/0006-3207(92)90595-E
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f70d5af5-14a7-40a3-99be-cba6b2fca05c (old id 774986)
date added to LUP
2008-01-02 17:09:49
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:40:51
@article{f70d5af5-14a7-40a3-99be-cba6b2fca05c,
  abstract     = {he conservation process involves recognizing and listing rare and decreasing species, recording their distribution, biology and specific threats, proposing conservation programmes, and executing these programmes.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
There are large gaps in our knowledge about bryophytes which must be filled before their conservation can be selective. These include taxonomy, bryogeography, habitat demands, natural dynamics, dispersal ability, population structure and genetics.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
In a long-term perspective, conservation must strive towards creating possibilities for the species to survive without too much artificial support. It is particularly important to focus on habitats and sites where the species may survive naturally during unfavourable periods. In the short term, creating nature reserves with large populations can save a species until our knowledge has increased. In practice, bryologists must be more active in collecting data and informing the conservation organizations and governmental authorities about the need for conservation.},
  author       = {Söderström, Lars and Hallingbäck, Tomas and Gustafsson, Lena and Cronberg, Nils and Hedenäs, Lars},
  issn         = {1873-2917},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {265--270},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biological Conservation},
  title        = {Bryophyte conservation for the future.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-3207(92)90595-E},
  volume       = {59},
  year         = {1992},
}