Advanced

Role of exosomes and microvesicles in hypoxia-associated tumour development and cardiovascular disease.

Belting, Mattias LU and Christianson, Helena LU (2015) In Journal of Internal Medicine 278(3). p.251-263
Abstract
Exosomes and microvesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), can transfer complex biological information and induce a diverse signalling response in recipient cells with potential relevance in a wide array of pathological conditions. Tissue hypoxia constitutes a stress-associated phenotype that is central to the malignant state of aggressive tumours as well as to ischaemic tissue in cardiovascular disorders. The adaptive response to hypoxic stress is largely dependent on intercellular communication in which EVs, and cellular exchange of EV cargo molecules, have recently been implicated. The results of numerous studies indicate that hypoxia-dependent shaping of the molecular profile of EVs may mediate the biological... (More)
Exosomes and microvesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), can transfer complex biological information and induce a diverse signalling response in recipient cells with potential relevance in a wide array of pathological conditions. Tissue hypoxia constitutes a stress-associated phenotype that is central to the malignant state of aggressive tumours as well as to ischaemic tissue in cardiovascular disorders. The adaptive response to hypoxic stress is largely dependent on intercellular communication in which EVs, and cellular exchange of EV cargo molecules, have recently been implicated. The results of numerous studies indicate that hypoxia-dependent shaping of the molecular profile of EVs may mediate the biological response to hypoxia. EVs have been shown to induce tumour angiogenesis and hypercoagulation as well as tissue remodelling and protective effects in ischaemic cardiovascular conditions. Recent findings report increased levels of circulating EVs in patients with hypoxia-associated disorders such as myocardial infarction, stroke and pre-eclampsia, indicating a role of EVs as biomarkers in these pathophysiological states. Here, we discuss the intriguing role of EVs in tumour development and cardiovascular disease, focusing on the paracrine transfer of the hypoxic response to neighbouring cells and to distant cells at the systemic level, with wide implications for biomarker discovery and therapeutic intervention. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
volume
278
issue
3
pages
251 - 263
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:26153525
  • wos:000359364000003
  • scopus:84938748112
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1111/joim.12393
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eca756c7-b458-4202-9d43-521182bf283a (old id 7750157)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26153525?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-08-07 00:15:48
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:18:00
@article{eca756c7-b458-4202-9d43-521182bf283a,
  abstract     = {Exosomes and microvesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), can transfer complex biological information and induce a diverse signalling response in recipient cells with potential relevance in a wide array of pathological conditions. Tissue hypoxia constitutes a stress-associated phenotype that is central to the malignant state of aggressive tumours as well as to ischaemic tissue in cardiovascular disorders. The adaptive response to hypoxic stress is largely dependent on intercellular communication in which EVs, and cellular exchange of EV cargo molecules, have recently been implicated. The results of numerous studies indicate that hypoxia-dependent shaping of the molecular profile of EVs may mediate the biological response to hypoxia. EVs have been shown to induce tumour angiogenesis and hypercoagulation as well as tissue remodelling and protective effects in ischaemic cardiovascular conditions. Recent findings report increased levels of circulating EVs in patients with hypoxia-associated disorders such as myocardial infarction, stroke and pre-eclampsia, indicating a role of EVs as biomarkers in these pathophysiological states. Here, we discuss the intriguing role of EVs in tumour development and cardiovascular disease, focusing on the paracrine transfer of the hypoxic response to neighbouring cells and to distant cells at the systemic level, with wide implications for biomarker discovery and therapeutic intervention.},
  author       = {Belting, Mattias and Christianson, Helena},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {251--263},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Role of exosomes and microvesicles in hypoxia-associated tumour development and cardiovascular disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12393},
  volume       = {278},
  year         = {2015},
}