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Exploring the balance between DNA pressure and capsid stability in Herpes and phage.

Bauer, D W; Li, D; Huffman, J; Homa, F L; Wilson, K; Leavitt, J C; Casjens, S R; Baines, J and Evilevitch, Alex LU (2015) In Journal of Virology 89(18). p.9288-9298
Abstract
We have recently shown in both herpesviruses and phages that packaged viral DNA creates a pressure of tens of atmospheres pushing against the interior capsid wall. For the first time, using differential scanning microcalorimetry, we directly measure the energy powering the release of pressurized DNA from the capsid. Furthermore, using a new calorimetric assay to accurately determine the temperature inducing DNA release, we found a direct influence of internal DNA pressure on the stability of the viral particle. We show that the balance of forces between the DNA pressure and capsid strength, required for DNA retention between rounds of infection, is conserved between evolutionarily diverse bacterial viruses (phage λ and P22), as well as a... (More)
We have recently shown in both herpesviruses and phages that packaged viral DNA creates a pressure of tens of atmospheres pushing against the interior capsid wall. For the first time, using differential scanning microcalorimetry, we directly measure the energy powering the release of pressurized DNA from the capsid. Furthermore, using a new calorimetric assay to accurately determine the temperature inducing DNA release, we found a direct influence of internal DNA pressure on the stability of the viral particle. We show that the balance of forces between the DNA pressure and capsid strength, required for DNA retention between rounds of infection, is conserved between evolutionarily diverse bacterial viruses (phage λ and P22), as well as a eukaryotic virus, human Herpes Simplex 1 (HSV-1). Our data also suggest that the portal vertex in these viruses is the weakest point in the overall capsid structure and presents the "Achilles' heel" of virus's stability. Comparison between these viral systems shows that viruses with higher DNA packing density (resulting in higher capsid pressure) have inherently stronger capsid structures preventing spontaneous genome release prior to infection. This force balance is of key importance for viral survival and replication. Investigating the ways to disrupt this balance can lead to development of new mutation resistant anti-virals. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Virology
volume
89
issue
18
pages
9288 - 9298
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • pmid:26136570
  • wos:000360704400014
  • scopus:84940517444
ISSN
1098-5514
DOI
10.1128/JVI.01172-15
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0c8350c0-267f-464e-b46a-2adaf94a89f7 (old id 7750870)
date added to LUP
2015-09-24 17:41:50
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:21:11
@article{0c8350c0-267f-464e-b46a-2adaf94a89f7,
  abstract     = {We have recently shown in both herpesviruses and phages that packaged viral DNA creates a pressure of tens of atmospheres pushing against the interior capsid wall. For the first time, using differential scanning microcalorimetry, we directly measure the energy powering the release of pressurized DNA from the capsid. Furthermore, using a new calorimetric assay to accurately determine the temperature inducing DNA release, we found a direct influence of internal DNA pressure on the stability of the viral particle. We show that the balance of forces between the DNA pressure and capsid strength, required for DNA retention between rounds of infection, is conserved between evolutionarily diverse bacterial viruses (phage λ and P22), as well as a eukaryotic virus, human Herpes Simplex 1 (HSV-1). Our data also suggest that the portal vertex in these viruses is the weakest point in the overall capsid structure and presents the "Achilles' heel" of virus's stability. Comparison between these viral systems shows that viruses with higher DNA packing density (resulting in higher capsid pressure) have inherently stronger capsid structures preventing spontaneous genome release prior to infection. This force balance is of key importance for viral survival and replication. Investigating the ways to disrupt this balance can lead to development of new mutation resistant anti-virals.},
  author       = {Bauer, D W and Li, D and Huffman, J and Homa, F L and Wilson, K and Leavitt, J C and Casjens, S R and Baines, J and Evilevitch, Alex},
  issn         = {1098-5514},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {18},
  pages        = {9288--9298},
  publisher    = {American Society for Microbiology},
  series       = {Journal of Virology},
  title        = {Exploring the balance between DNA pressure and capsid stability in Herpes and phage.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01172-15},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2015},
}