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Accessible Transportation, Geographic Elevation, and Masticatory Ability Among Elderly Residents of a Rural Area.

Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Tominaga, Kazumichi; Takeda, Miwako; Sundquist, Kristina LU and Nabika, Toru (2015) In International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12(7). p.7199-7207
Abstract
Given that public transportation networks are often worse in rural areas than in urban areas, rural residents who do not drive can find it difficult to access health-promoting goods, services, and resources related to masticatory ability. Moreover, geographical location, assessed by elevation, could modify this association. The aim of this study was to test whether the association between access to transportation and masticatory ability varied by elevation. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in Mizuho and Iwami counties, Japan. Objective masticatory ability was evaluated using a test gummy jelly and elevation was estimated by the geographic information systems according to the participant's address. After excluding... (More)
Given that public transportation networks are often worse in rural areas than in urban areas, rural residents who do not drive can find it difficult to access health-promoting goods, services, and resources related to masticatory ability. Moreover, geographical location, assessed by elevation, could modify this association. The aim of this study was to test whether the association between access to transportation and masticatory ability varied by elevation. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in Mizuho and Iwami counties, Japan. Objective masticatory ability was evaluated using a test gummy jelly and elevation was estimated by the geographic information systems according to the participant's address. After excluding subjects with missing data, 672 subjects (Mizuho = 401 and Iwami = 271) were analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounders, being a driver was not significantly associated with masticatory ability among elderly people living at low elevation (≤313 m) in Mizuho county. However, after the same adjustment, being a driver remained significantly associated with increased masticatory ability among elderly at high elevations. Similar findings were observed in Iwami county. Accessible transportation was significantly associated with increased mastication ability in elderly people living at high elevations, but not in those living at low elevations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
volume
12
issue
7
pages
7199 - 7207
publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
external identifiers
  • pmid:26132474
  • wos:000359342300007
  • scopus:84933574572
ISSN
1660-4601
DOI
10.3390/ijerph120707199
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
433335e6-b9b7-4fd5-a027-7c8e2c5f382a (old id 7751168)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26132474?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-08-01 21:57:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:11:24
@article{433335e6-b9b7-4fd5-a027-7c8e2c5f382a,
  abstract     = {Given that public transportation networks are often worse in rural areas than in urban areas, rural residents who do not drive can find it difficult to access health-promoting goods, services, and resources related to masticatory ability. Moreover, geographical location, assessed by elevation, could modify this association. The aim of this study was to test whether the association between access to transportation and masticatory ability varied by elevation. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in Mizuho and Iwami counties, Japan. Objective masticatory ability was evaluated using a test gummy jelly and elevation was estimated by the geographic information systems according to the participant's address. After excluding subjects with missing data, 672 subjects (Mizuho = 401 and Iwami = 271) were analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounders, being a driver was not significantly associated with masticatory ability among elderly people living at low elevation (≤313 m) in Mizuho county. However, after the same adjustment, being a driver remained significantly associated with increased masticatory ability among elderly at high elevations. Similar findings were observed in Iwami county. Accessible transportation was significantly associated with increased mastication ability in elderly people living at high elevations, but not in those living at low elevations.},
  author       = {Hamano, Tsuyoshi and Tominaga, Kazumichi and Takeda, Miwako and Sundquist, Kristina and Nabika, Toru},
  issn         = {1660-4601},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {7199--7207},
  publisher    = {Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)},
  series       = {International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health},
  title        = {Accessible Transportation, Geographic Elevation, and Masticatory Ability Among Elderly Residents of a Rural Area.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph120707199},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2015},
}