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Host preferences of ornithophilic biting midges of the genus Culicoides in the Eastern Balkans

Bobeva, A.; Zehtindjiev, P.; Ilieva, Mihaela LU ; Dimitrov, D.; Mathis, A. and Bensch, Staffan LU (2015) In Medical and Veterinary Entomology 29(3). p.290-296
Abstract
Many biting midges of the genus CulicoidesLatreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are competent vectors of a diverse number of pathogens. The identification of their feeding behaviour and of vector-host associations is essential for understanding their transmission capacity. By applying two different nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, of which one targeted the avian cyt b gene and the other targeted the COI gene of a wide range of vertebrates, we identified the blood hosts of six biting midge species including Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides pictipennis, Culicoides alazanicus and Culicoides cf. griseidorsum, the latter two of which are reported in Bulgaria for the first... (More)
Many biting midges of the genus CulicoidesLatreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are competent vectors of a diverse number of pathogens. The identification of their feeding behaviour and of vector-host associations is essential for understanding their transmission capacity. By applying two different nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, of which one targeted the avian cyt b gene and the other targeted the COI gene of a wide range of vertebrates, we identified the blood hosts of six biting midge species including Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides pictipennis, Culicoides alazanicus and Culicoides cf. griseidorsum, the latter two of which are reported in Bulgaria for the first time. Bird DNA was found in 50.6% of 95 investigated bloodmeals, whereas mammalian DNA was identified in 13.7%. Two Culicoides species were found to feed on both birds and mammals. There was remarkable diversity in the range of avian hosts: 23 species from four orders were identified in the abdomens of four Culicoides species. The most common bird species identified was the magpie, Pica pica (n=7), which was registered in all four ornithophilic biting midge species. Six bloodmeals from the great tit, Parus major, were recorded only in C.alazanicus. None of the studied species of Culicoides appeared to be restricted to a single avian host. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Culicoides, Haemoproteus, bloodmeal, host preferences, vector-host, associations
in
Medical and Veterinary Entomology
volume
29
issue
3
pages
290 - 296
publisher
The Royal Entomological Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000358693500009
  • scopus:84937724438
ISSN
0269-283X
DOI
10.1111/mve.12108
project
Malaria in birds
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c6b90c87-6060-4422-aa2f-51f3eba62b9c (old id 7767702)
date added to LUP
2015-09-02 11:38:41
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:10:09
@article{c6b90c87-6060-4422-aa2f-51f3eba62b9c,
  abstract     = {Many biting midges of the genus CulicoidesLatreille, 1809 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are competent vectors of a diverse number of pathogens. The identification of their feeding behaviour and of vector-host associations is essential for understanding their transmission capacity. By applying two different nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, of which one targeted the avian cyt b gene and the other targeted the COI gene of a wide range of vertebrates, we identified the blood hosts of six biting midge species including Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides festivipennis, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides pictipennis, Culicoides alazanicus and Culicoides cf. griseidorsum, the latter two of which are reported in Bulgaria for the first time. Bird DNA was found in 50.6% of 95 investigated bloodmeals, whereas mammalian DNA was identified in 13.7%. Two Culicoides species were found to feed on both birds and mammals. There was remarkable diversity in the range of avian hosts: 23 species from four orders were identified in the abdomens of four Culicoides species. The most common bird species identified was the magpie, Pica pica (n=7), which was registered in all four ornithophilic biting midge species. Six bloodmeals from the great tit, Parus major, were recorded only in C.alazanicus. None of the studied species of Culicoides appeared to be restricted to a single avian host.},
  author       = {Bobeva, A. and Zehtindjiev, P. and Ilieva, Mihaela and Dimitrov, D. and Mathis, A. and Bensch, Staffan},
  issn         = {0269-283X},
  keyword      = {Culicoides,Haemoproteus,bloodmeal,host preferences,vector-host,associations},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {290--296},
  publisher    = {The Royal Entomological Society},
  series       = {Medical and Veterinary Entomology},
  title        = {Host preferences of ornithophilic biting midges of the genus Culicoides in the Eastern Balkans},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mve.12108},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2015},
}