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Adsorption and Activation of CO on Co3O4(111) Thin Films

Ferstl, P.; Mehl, S.; Arman, Mohammad A LU ; Schuler, M.; Toghan, A.; Laszlo, B.; Lykhach, Y.; Brummel, O.; Lundgren, Edvin LU and Knudsen, Jan LU , et al. (2015) In Journal of Physical Chemistry C 119(29). p.16688-16699
Abstract
To explore the catalytic properties of cobalt oxide at the atomic level, we have studied the interaction of CO and O-2 with well-ordered Co3O4(111) thin films using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy (TPD) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. At low coverage and temperature, CO binds to surface Co2+ ions on the (111) facets. At larger exposure, a compressed phase is formed in which additional CO is located at sites in between the Co2+ ions. In addition, a bridging carbonate species forms that is associated with defects such as step edges of Co3O4(111) terraces or the side... (More)
To explore the catalytic properties of cobalt oxide at the atomic level, we have studied the interaction of CO and O-2 with well-ordered Co3O4(111) thin films using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy (TPD) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. At low coverage and temperature, CO binds to surface Co2+ ions on the (111) facets. At larger exposure, a compressed phase is formed in which additional CO is located at sites in between the Co2+ ions. In addition, a bridging carbonate species forms that is associated with defects such as step edges of Co3O4(111) terraces or the side facets of the (111) oriented grains. Preadsorbed oxygen neither affects CO adsorption at low coverage nor the formation of the surface carbonate, but it blocks formation of the high coverage CO phase. Desorption of the molecularly bound CO occurs up to 180 K, whereas the surface carbonate decomposes in a broad temperature range up to 400 K under the release of CO and, to a lesser extent, of CO2. Upon strong loss of crystalline oxygen, the Co3O4 grains eventually switch to the CoO rocksalt structure. (Less)
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publication status
published
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in
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
volume
119
issue
29
pages
16688 - 16699
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000358624000032
  • scopus:84937825037
ISSN
1932-7447
DOI
10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b04145
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
482f538f-489a-4cad-b073-3c73be14f564 (old id 7770604)
date added to LUP
2015-09-18 15:20:44
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:07:11
@article{482f538f-489a-4cad-b073-3c73be14f564,
  abstract     = {To explore the catalytic properties of cobalt oxide at the atomic level, we have studied the interaction of CO and O-2 with well-ordered Co3O4(111) thin films using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy (TPD) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. At low coverage and temperature, CO binds to surface Co2+ ions on the (111) facets. At larger exposure, a compressed phase is formed in which additional CO is located at sites in between the Co2+ ions. In addition, a bridging carbonate species forms that is associated with defects such as step edges of Co3O4(111) terraces or the side facets of the (111) oriented grains. Preadsorbed oxygen neither affects CO adsorption at low coverage nor the formation of the surface carbonate, but it blocks formation of the high coverage CO phase. Desorption of the molecularly bound CO occurs up to 180 K, whereas the surface carbonate decomposes in a broad temperature range up to 400 K under the release of CO and, to a lesser extent, of CO2. Upon strong loss of crystalline oxygen, the Co3O4 grains eventually switch to the CoO rocksalt structure.},
  author       = {Ferstl, P. and Mehl, S. and Arman, Mohammad A and Schuler, M. and Toghan, A. and Laszlo, B. and Lykhach, Y. and Brummel, O. and Lundgren, Edvin and Knudsen, Jan and Hammer, L. and Schneider, M. A. and Libuda, J.},
  issn         = {1932-7447},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {29},
  pages        = {16688--16699},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Physical Chemistry C},
  title        = {Adsorption and Activation of CO on Co3O4(111) Thin Films},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b04145},
  volume       = {119},
  year         = {2015},
}