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Does Combinatorial Knowledge Lead to a Better Innovation Performance of Firms?

Toedtling, Franz and Grillitsch, Markus LU (2015) In European Planning Studies 23(9). p.1741-1758
Abstract
The knowledge base concept in the past was often applied in its "pure form", i.e. it was assumed that there are dominant knowledge bases in particular sectors and firms shaping knowledge and innovation processes and related networks. For "analytical sectors" such as biotech, it has been argued that codified knowledge generated by universities and R&D organizations is the key for innovation, whereas "synthetic sectors" such as machinery innovate more incrementally by recombining existing knowledge often drawn from suppliers or service firms. Empirical literature has partly confirmed these patters, but also shown more complex knowledge processes. More recently it has been argued that combinations of different knowledge bases might... (More)
The knowledge base concept in the past was often applied in its "pure form", i.e. it was assumed that there are dominant knowledge bases in particular sectors and firms shaping knowledge and innovation processes and related networks. For "analytical sectors" such as biotech, it has been argued that codified knowledge generated by universities and R&D organizations is the key for innovation, whereas "synthetic sectors" such as machinery innovate more incrementally by recombining existing knowledge often drawn from suppliers or service firms. Empirical literature has partly confirmed these patters, but also shown more complex knowledge processes. More recently it has been argued that combinations of different knowledge bases might enhance the innovation performance of firms. For example in "analytical sectors", firms might benefit not just from new and basic knowledge generated by research, but also from recombining existing and applied knowledge or by drawing on symbolic knowledge. Combinatorial knowledge bases might also be relevant for "synthetic" and "symbolic sectors", but in different forms. This study investigates for the ICT sector in regions of Austria if the reliance on combinatorial knowledge leads to a better innovation performance than the use of more narrow knowledge bases. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
skill recruitment, knowledge base, knowledge sourcing, ICT sector, innovation, combinatorial knowledge
in
European Planning Studies
volume
23
issue
9
pages
1741 - 1758
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000358412900004
  • scopus:84937253070
ISSN
1469-5944
DOI
10.1080/09654313.2015.1056773
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
630e83fe-8a10-48e9-8e83-6b71da53facb (old id 7773625)
date added to LUP
2015-09-09 14:41:25
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:19:41
@article{630e83fe-8a10-48e9-8e83-6b71da53facb,
  abstract     = {The knowledge base concept in the past was often applied in its "pure form", i.e. it was assumed that there are dominant knowledge bases in particular sectors and firms shaping knowledge and innovation processes and related networks. For "analytical sectors" such as biotech, it has been argued that codified knowledge generated by universities and R&D organizations is the key for innovation, whereas "synthetic sectors" such as machinery innovate more incrementally by recombining existing knowledge often drawn from suppliers or service firms. Empirical literature has partly confirmed these patters, but also shown more complex knowledge processes. More recently it has been argued that combinations of different knowledge bases might enhance the innovation performance of firms. For example in "analytical sectors", firms might benefit not just from new and basic knowledge generated by research, but also from recombining existing and applied knowledge or by drawing on symbolic knowledge. Combinatorial knowledge bases might also be relevant for "synthetic" and "symbolic sectors", but in different forms. This study investigates for the ICT sector in regions of Austria if the reliance on combinatorial knowledge leads to a better innovation performance than the use of more narrow knowledge bases.},
  author       = {Toedtling, Franz and Grillitsch, Markus},
  issn         = {1469-5944},
  keyword      = {skill recruitment,knowledge base,knowledge sourcing,ICT sector,innovation,combinatorial knowledge},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1741--1758},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {European Planning Studies},
  title        = {Does Combinatorial Knowledge Lead to a Better Innovation Performance of Firms?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09654313.2015.1056773},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2015},
}