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Mitochondrial energy signaling and its role in the low-oxygen stress response of plants

Wagner, Stephan; Van Aken, Olivier LU ; Elsässer, Marlene and Schwarzländer, Markus (2018) In Plant Physiology 176(2). p.1156-1170
Abstract
Cells of complex organisms typically rely on mitochondria for energy provision. The amount of energy required to sustain cellular activity can vary strongly depending on external conditions. Vice versa, constraints on respiratory activity due to metabolic status or stress insult require mitochondrial signaling to coordinate cellular physiology with the function of the organelle. In this update, we review recent insights into plant mitochondrial energy signaling in the light of their significance to stress acclimation. First, we focus on the characteristic adjustments of the nuclear transcriptome that occur after pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the output of mitochondrial retrograde signaling.... (More)
Cells of complex organisms typically rely on mitochondria for energy provision. The amount of energy required to sustain cellular activity can vary strongly depending on external conditions. Vice versa, constraints on respiratory activity due to metabolic status or stress insult require mitochondrial signaling to coordinate cellular physiology with the function of the organelle. In this update, we review recent insights into plant mitochondrial energy signaling in the light of their significance to stress acclimation. First, we focus on the characteristic adjustments of the nuclear transcriptome that occur after pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the output of mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Second, we discuss the proteins that have recently been identified as regulators of the transcript responses and the emerging picture of their action as a signaling network. We then pose the question of how well our current models of inducing mitochondrial dysfunction relate to conditions that plants face naturally. We reason that low-oxygen stress shows striking similarities with electron transport inhibitors with respect to their impact on mitochondrial energy physiology upstream, as well as the cellular transcriptomic response. Finally, we highlight and discuss changes in mitochondrial physiology that are common to both stimuli as candidates for upstream signals. The aim of this update is to better define the physiological context in which mitochondrial signaling operates to provide new directions for future research.
RESPONSES TO MITOCHONDRIAL ENERGY SIGNALING AT THE TRANSCRIPT LEVEL (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Plant Physiology
volume
176
issue
2
pages
15 pages
publisher
American Society of Plant Biologists
external identifiers
  • scopus:85041717856
ISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.17.01387
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
77d30a72-31df-4b84-99c7-029cd8b805fe
date added to LUP
2018-02-21 12:03:43
date last changed
2018-10-21 04:54:13
@misc{77d30a72-31df-4b84-99c7-029cd8b805fe,
  abstract     = {Cells of complex organisms typically rely on mitochondria for energy provision. The amount of energy required to sustain cellular activity can vary strongly depending on external conditions. Vice versa, constraints on respiratory activity due to metabolic status or stress insult require mitochondrial signaling to coordinate cellular physiology with the function of the organelle. In this update, we review recent insights into plant mitochondrial energy signaling in the light of their significance to stress acclimation. First, we focus on the characteristic adjustments of the nuclear transcriptome that occur after pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the output of mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Second, we discuss the proteins that have recently been identified as regulators of the transcript responses and the emerging picture of their action as a signaling network. We then pose the question of how well our current models of inducing mitochondrial dysfunction relate to conditions that plants face naturally. We reason that low-oxygen stress shows striking similarities with electron transport inhibitors with respect to their impact on mitochondrial energy physiology upstream, as well as the cellular transcriptomic response. Finally, we highlight and discuss changes in mitochondrial physiology that are common to both stimuli as candidates for upstream signals. The aim of this update is to better define the physiological context in which mitochondrial signaling operates to provide new directions for future research.<br/>RESPONSES TO MITOCHONDRIAL ENERGY SIGNALING AT THE TRANSCRIPT LEVEL},
  author       = {Wagner, Stephan and Van Aken, Olivier and Elsässer, Marlene and Schwarzländer, Markus},
  issn         = {0032-0889},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {1156--1170},
  publisher    = {American Society of Plant Biologists},
  series       = {Plant Physiology},
  title        = {Mitochondrial energy signaling and its role in the low-oxygen stress response of plants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.01387},
  volume       = {176},
  year         = {2018},
}