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Italian primary care system: An overview

PETRAZZUOLI, FERDINANDO LU (2016) In Family Medicine and Primary Care Review 18(2). p.163-167
Abstract

Italian Primary Care System has been modelled after the NHS in UK and was established in 1978. In 2000 Italy's healthcare system was regarded, by a World Health Organization's ranking, as the 2nd best in the world after France;since then, the performance has constantly decreased mainly because ofthe austerity policy. This austerity policy is notjustified by the Official OECD figures which show that Italian Health Care expenditures are below the average in OECD Countries. Quality outcomes almost always show a clear North-South divide in almost all health care sectors. Responsibility for health care is now shared between the central government and 19 regions and 2 autonomous provinces (Trento and Bolzano), which traditionally... (More)

Italian Primary Care System has been modelled after the NHS in UK and was established in 1978. In 2000 Italy's healthcare system was regarded, by a World Health Organization's ranking, as the 2nd best in the world after France;since then, the performance has constantly decreased mainly because ofthe austerity policy. This austerity policy is notjustified by the Official OECD figures which show that Italian Health Care expenditures are below the average in OECD Countries. Quality outcomes almost always show a clear North-South divide in almost all health care sectors. Responsibility for health care is now shared between the central government and 19 regions and 2 autonomous provinces (Trento and Bolzano), which traditionally differ a lot in terms ofeconomic development, per capita income, demography and culture. Disparities can be found in almost any area of health care provision, in health policy making, health care expenditure, quality of health care, public satisfaction and health care services organization. The pros ofthe Italian Primary Care System are the continuity of care and the universalism; the cons are the crippling bureaucracy, the workload, the lack of basic social benefits for GPs such as subsidized sick leaves and the lack of University Department of Primary Care and finally the absence of any perspective of professional development in the Academic field.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Continuity of care, General practice, Health care costs, Primary health care
in
Family Medicine and Primary Care Review
volume
18
issue
2
pages
5 pages
publisher
Wydawnictwo Continuo
external identifiers
  • scopus:84975317570
  • wos:000390762500013
ISSN
1734-3402
DOI
10.5114/fmpcr/58995
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
77f215c4-083f-4c69-b038-816d240de403
date added to LUP
2016-06-30 08:57:28
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:30:10
@article{77f215c4-083f-4c69-b038-816d240de403,
  abstract     = {<p>Italian Primary Care System has been modelled after the NHS in UK and was established in 1978. In 2000 Italy's healthcare system was regarded, by a World Health Organization's ranking, as the 2<sup>nd</sup> best in the world after France;since then, the performance has constantly decreased mainly because ofthe austerity policy. This austerity policy is notjustified by the Official OECD figures which show that Italian Health Care expenditures are below the average in OECD Countries. Quality outcomes almost always show a clear North-South divide in almost all health care sectors. Responsibility for health care is now shared between the central government and 19 regions and 2 autonomous provinces (Trento and Bolzano), which traditionally differ a lot in terms ofeconomic development, per capita income, demography and culture. Disparities can be found in almost any area of health care provision, in health policy making, health care expenditure, quality of health care, public satisfaction and health care services organization. The pros ofthe Italian Primary Care System are the continuity of care and the universalism; the cons are the crippling bureaucracy, the workload, the lack of basic social benefits for GPs such as subsidized sick leaves and the lack of University Department of Primary Care and finally the absence of any perspective of professional development in the Academic field.</p>},
  author       = {PETRAZZUOLI, FERDINANDO},
  issn         = {1734-3402},
  keyword      = {Continuity of care,General practice,Health care costs,Primary health care},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {163--167},
  publisher    = {Wydawnictwo Continuo},
  series       = {Family Medicine and Primary Care Review},
  title        = {Italian primary care system: An overview},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/fmpcr/58995},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2016},
}