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Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects.

Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan LU ; Zilkens, Christoph and Krauspe, Rüdiger (2015) In Frontiers in surgery 2. p.34-34
Abstract
Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging... (More)
Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Frontiers in surgery
volume
2
pages
34 - 34
publisher
Frontiers Media
external identifiers
  • pmid:26258129
ISSN
2296-875X
DOI
10.3389/fsurg.2015.00034
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6af08d60-621c-4a2c-ba2e-62eca4672691 (old id 7844302)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26258129?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-09-05 16:38:34
date last changed
2016-09-30 05:46:18
@article{6af08d60-621c-4a2c-ba2e-62eca4672691,
  abstract     = {Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined.},
  author       = {Bittersohl, Bernd and Hosalkar, Harish S and Hesper, Tobias and Tiderius, Carl Johan and Zilkens, Christoph and Krauspe, Rüdiger},
  issn         = {2296-875X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {34--34},
  publisher    = {Frontiers Media},
  series       = {Frontiers in surgery},
  title        = {Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2015.00034},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2015},
}