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Inflammation and neurodegeneration : the story 'retolled'

Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle LU and Cicchetti, Francesca (2012) In Trends in Pharmacological Sciences 33(10). p.51-542
Abstract

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity by recognizing conserved motifs predominantly found in microorganisms. Increasing evidence supports a role for TLRs in sterile inflammation as observed in neurodegenerative disorders. This includes work suggesting a contribution for these receptors to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and related disorders. In this review, the potential role of TLRs in the context of protein aggregation, neuronal degeneration, and genetic risk factors is addressed. In particular, we discuss the evidence derived from experimental models of both AD and PD which suggests that activation of TLRs can have beneficial and detrimental effects on... (More)

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity by recognizing conserved motifs predominantly found in microorganisms. Increasing evidence supports a role for TLRs in sterile inflammation as observed in neurodegenerative disorders. This includes work suggesting a contribution for these receptors to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and related disorders. In this review, the potential role of TLRs in the context of protein aggregation, neuronal degeneration, and genetic risk factors is addressed. In particular, we discuss the evidence derived from experimental models of both AD and PD which suggests that activation of TLRs can have beneficial and detrimental effects on pathological features such as protein aggregation and neuronal death. A deeper understanding of these dichotomous observations could be used for therapeutic benefit.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Alzheimer Disease, Animals, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation, Parkinson Disease, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptors, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review
in
Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
volume
33
issue
10
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84866734401
ISSN
0165-6147
DOI
10.1016/j.tips.2012.07.002
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
78488115-5529-47a1-8506-012b5b543bc8
date added to LUP
2016-11-22 09:04:29
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:35:02
@article{78488115-5529-47a1-8506-012b5b543bc8,
  abstract     = {<p>Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity by recognizing conserved motifs predominantly found in microorganisms. Increasing evidence supports a role for TLRs in sterile inflammation as observed in neurodegenerative disorders. This includes work suggesting a contribution for these receptors to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and related disorders. In this review, the potential role of TLRs in the context of protein aggregation, neuronal degeneration, and genetic risk factors is addressed. In particular, we discuss the evidence derived from experimental models of both AD and PD which suggests that activation of TLRs can have beneficial and detrimental effects on pathological features such as protein aggregation and neuronal death. A deeper understanding of these dichotomous observations could be used for therapeutic benefit.</p>},
  author       = {Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle and Cicchetti, Francesca},
  issn         = {0165-6147},
  keyword      = {Alzheimer Disease,Animals,Humans,Immunity, Innate,Inflammation,Parkinson Disease,Signal Transduction,Toll-Like Receptors,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't,Review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {51--542},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Pharmacological Sciences},
  title        = {Inflammation and neurodegeneration : the story 'retolled'},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tips.2012.07.002},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2012},
}