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Prenatal restraint stress and long-term affective consequences

Van den Hove, DLA; Blanco, CE; Aendekerk, B; Desbonnet, L; Bruschettini, Matteo LU ; Steinbusch, HP; Prickaerts, J and Steinbusch, HWM (2005) In Developmental Neuroscience 27(5). p.313-320
Abstract
Chronic or repeated stress during critical periods of human fetal brain development has been associated with various learning, behavioral and/or mood disorders in later life. In this investigation, pregnant Fischer 344 rats was individually restrained three times a day for 45 min during the last week of gestation in transparent plastic cylinders while at the same time being exposed to bright light. Control pregnant females were left undisturbed in their home cages. Anxiety and depressive-like behavior was measured in the offspring at an age of 6 months using the open field test, the home cage emergence test and the forced swim test. Prenatally stressed rats spent more time in the corners and less time along the walls of an open field,... (More)
Chronic or repeated stress during critical periods of human fetal brain development has been associated with various learning, behavioral and/or mood disorders in later life. In this investigation, pregnant Fischer 344 rats was individually restrained three times a day for 45 min during the last week of gestation in transparent plastic cylinders while at the same time being exposed to bright light. Control pregnant females were left undisturbed in their home cages. Anxiety and depressive-like behavior was measured in the offspring at an age of 6 months using the open field test, the home cage emergence test and the forced swim test. Prenatally stressed rats spent more time in the corners and less time along the walls of an open field, while no difference in total distance moved was observed. In addition, prenatally stressed rats took more time to leave their home cage in the home cage emergence test. On the other hand, no differences in immobility were observed in the forced swim test. Moreover, prenatally stressed rats showed lower stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels compared with control rats. Prenatal stress (PS) had no effect on the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells - used as a measure for cell proliferation - in the dentate gyrus of these rats. These data further support the idea that PS may perturb normal anxiety-related development. However, the present data also suggest that an adaptive or protective effect of PS should not be ignored. Genetic factors are likely to play a role in this respect. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
depression, anxiety, neurogenesis, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, pregnancy
in
Developmental Neuroscience
volume
27
issue
5
pages
313 - 320
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000231701800005
  • scopus:24144438221
ISSN
1421-9859
DOI
10.1159/000086711
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
adfbd0b6-e11e-4eda-8001-1cb7fdcb3940 (old id 7856300)
date added to LUP
2015-09-07 11:07:59
date last changed
2017-04-23 03:27:39
@article{adfbd0b6-e11e-4eda-8001-1cb7fdcb3940,
  abstract     = {Chronic or repeated stress during critical periods of human fetal brain development has been associated with various learning, behavioral and/or mood disorders in later life. In this investigation, pregnant Fischer 344 rats was individually restrained three times a day for 45 min during the last week of gestation in transparent plastic cylinders while at the same time being exposed to bright light. Control pregnant females were left undisturbed in their home cages. Anxiety and depressive-like behavior was measured in the offspring at an age of 6 months using the open field test, the home cage emergence test and the forced swim test. Prenatally stressed rats spent more time in the corners and less time along the walls of an open field, while no difference in total distance moved was observed. In addition, prenatally stressed rats took more time to leave their home cage in the home cage emergence test. On the other hand, no differences in immobility were observed in the forced swim test. Moreover, prenatally stressed rats showed lower stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels compared with control rats. Prenatal stress (PS) had no effect on the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells - used as a measure for cell proliferation - in the dentate gyrus of these rats. These data further support the idea that PS may perturb normal anxiety-related development. However, the present data also suggest that an adaptive or protective effect of PS should not be ignored. Genetic factors are likely to play a role in this respect. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
  author       = {Van den Hove, DLA and Blanco, CE and Aendekerk, B and Desbonnet, L and Bruschettini, Matteo and Steinbusch, HP and Prickaerts, J and Steinbusch, HWM},
  issn         = {1421-9859},
  keyword      = {depression,anxiety,neurogenesis,hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,pregnancy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {313--320},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Developmental Neuroscience},
  title        = {Prenatal restraint stress and long-term affective consequences},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000086711},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2005},
}