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Separation between pedestrians and bicyclists

Svensson, Åse LU ; Sakshaug, Lisa LU and Hydén, Christer LU (2007) TRB's 3rd Urban Street Symposium
Abstract
In the effort to separate pedestrian and bicycle traffic from motorised traffic the solution often is to let the pedestrians and bicyclists share space. However, combined pedestrian and bicycle paths lead to problems for both pedestrians and bicyclists; for pedestrians it is a security and safety problem and for bicyclists a mobility problem. Seniors and visually impaired pedestrians are especially concerned as they often feel insecure when cyclists pass close to them, especially as they neither can see nor hear cyclists coming from behind. The safety problem is primarily linked to pedestrians walking on the bicycle side of the tracks. Designing the tracks so that the pedestrians and bicyclists keep to their side respectively is important... (More)
In the effort to separate pedestrian and bicycle traffic from motorised traffic the solution often is to let the pedestrians and bicyclists share space. However, combined pedestrian and bicycle paths lead to problems for both pedestrians and bicyclists; for pedestrians it is a security and safety problem and for bicyclists a mobility problem. Seniors and visually impaired pedestrians are especially concerned as they often feel insecure when cyclists pass close to them, especially as they neither can see nor hear cyclists coming from behind. The safety problem is primarily linked to pedestrians walking on the bicycle side of the tracks. Designing the tracks so that the pedestrians and bicyclists keep to their side respectively is important to improve the situation. Field studies were performed at over 100 pedestrian and bicycle tracks and the results were analysed with respect to materials, separation line, flow, signs, dimensions, road markings and surroundings. The results show that the design has a great impact on whether the road users keep to their side of the pedestrian and bicycle tracks or not. The most efficient design seems to be a difference in material, asphalt on the bicycle side and tiles on the pedestrian side, together with a separation of the two sides, e.g. by paving stones or curbs. Signing has no impact at all whereas the road markings has a great impact, which is interesting both from a perceptional view point and also from the point of view that Swedish rules do not support the use of markings but signing. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
pages
10 pages
conference name
TRB's 3rd Urban Street Symposium
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
34410437-bb63-4ccb-a3a5-32e9e8ec8baa (old id 789322)
date added to LUP
2007-12-20 19:03:04
date last changed
2016-04-16 11:36:53
@misc{34410437-bb63-4ccb-a3a5-32e9e8ec8baa,
  abstract     = {In the effort to separate pedestrian and bicycle traffic from motorised traffic the solution often is to let the pedestrians and bicyclists share space. However, combined pedestrian and bicycle paths lead to problems for both pedestrians and bicyclists; for pedestrians it is a security and safety problem and for bicyclists a mobility problem. Seniors and visually impaired pedestrians are especially concerned as they often feel insecure when cyclists pass close to them, especially as they neither can see nor hear cyclists coming from behind. The safety problem is primarily linked to pedestrians walking on the bicycle side of the tracks. Designing the tracks so that the pedestrians and bicyclists keep to their side respectively is important to improve the situation. Field studies were performed at over 100 pedestrian and bicycle tracks and the results were analysed with respect to materials, separation line, flow, signs, dimensions, road markings and surroundings. The results show that the design has a great impact on whether the road users keep to their side of the pedestrian and bicycle tracks or not. The most efficient design seems to be a difference in material, asphalt on the bicycle side and tiles on the pedestrian side, together with a separation of the two sides, e.g. by paving stones or curbs. Signing has no impact at all whereas the road markings has a great impact, which is interesting both from a perceptional view point and also from the point of view that Swedish rules do not support the use of markings but signing.},
  author       = {Svensson, Åse and Sakshaug, Lisa and Hydén, Christer},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {Separation between pedestrians and bicyclists},
  year         = {2007},
}