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Special Transportation Service in Sweden – Involvement of Private Operators.

Ståhl, Agneta LU (1987) In Transportation Research Record 1170. p.35-38
Abstract
Since 1979, every municipality in Sweden has been able to offer
its inhabitants Special Transportation Service (STS). STS has a
firm primary-municipality connection and organization. The
municipality, however, receives a national subsidy, which today
amounts to a maximum of 35 percent of a municipality's
overall costs for STS. In 1986, 5 percent of the Swedish population
was entitled to Special Transportation Service. As things
have developed, STS has become primarily a means of transportation
for the elderly. Every fifth person over age 65 is
entitled, and the elderly constitute more than 85 percent of
entitlements nationwide. Travel by Special Transportation Service
has increased greatly during... (More)
Since 1979, every municipality in Sweden has been able to offer
its inhabitants Special Transportation Service (STS). STS has a
firm primary-municipality connection and organization. The
municipality, however, receives a national subsidy, which today
amounts to a maximum of 35 percent of a municipality's
overall costs for STS. In 1986, 5 percent of the Swedish population
was entitled to Special Transportation Service. As things
have developed, STS has become primarily a means of transportation
for the elderly. Every fifth person over age 65 is
entitled, and the elderly constitute more than 85 percent of
entitlements nationwide. Travel by Special Transportation Service
has increased greatly during the past 10 years. The overall
costs for the STS transportation in Sweden in 1986 were approximately
$200 million. The nationwide average municipal
cost for an STS trip in 1986 was $13. The cost range is wide,
however, from a low cost of $6 to a high cost of $30. The range
in the costs for different municipalities is mainly a result of the
variations in policy among municipalities, such as prior reservation
of a trip, obligatory collective travel, and the amount to
be paid by the entitled person. Because of the increased costs of
STS travel, many municipalities have now started to review the
organization of STS. Until now the municipality has purchased
the main part (95 percent) of the Special Transportation Service
from the taxi companies. Many municipalities, however,
are now trying new solutions in providing transportation for
the elderly and disabled. In some municipalities, this has already
led to a declining role for the private sector's (taxis')
Involvement in providing this transportation service. There are
Indications that this development will continue in the future. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Transportation Research Record
volume
1170
pages
35 - 38
publisher
Transportation Research Board, Washington DC, USA
ISSN
0361-1981
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7960dba2-1a0c-47eb-aa22-848b28445a51
alternative location
http://onlinepubs.trb.org/Onlinepubs/trr/1988/1170/1170-005.pdf
date added to LUP
2018-06-17 20:26:01
date last changed
2018-06-21 14:35:14
@article{7960dba2-1a0c-47eb-aa22-848b28445a51,
  abstract     = {Since 1979, every municipality in Sweden has been able to offer<br/>its inhabitants Special Transportation Service (STS). STS has a<br/>firm primary-municipality connection and organization. The<br/>municipality, however, receives a national subsidy, which today<br/>amounts to a maximum of 35 percent of a municipality's<br/>overall costs for STS. In 1986, 5 percent of the Swedish population<br/>was entitled to Special Transportation Service. As things<br/>have developed, STS has become primarily a means of transportation<br/>for the elderly. Every fifth person over age 65 is<br/>entitled, and the elderly constitute more than 85 percent of<br/>entitlements nationwide. Travel by Special Transportation Service<br/>has increased greatly during the past 10 years. The overall<br/>costs for the STS transportation in Sweden in 1986 were approximately<br/>$200 million. The nationwide average municipal<br/>cost for an STS trip in 1986 was $13. The cost range is wide,<br/>however, from a low cost of $6 to a high cost of $30. The range<br/>in the costs for different municipalities is mainly a result of the<br/>variations in policy among municipalities, such as prior reservation<br/>of a trip, obligatory collective travel, and the amount to<br/>be paid by the entitled person. Because of the increased costs of<br/>STS travel, many municipalities have now started to review the<br/>organization of STS. Until now the municipality has purchased<br/>the main part (95 percent) of the Special Transportation Service<br/>from the taxi companies. Many municipalities, however,<br/>are now trying new solutions in providing transportation for<br/>the elderly and disabled. In some municipalities, this has already<br/>led to a declining role for the private sector's (taxis')<br/>Involvement in providing this transportation service. There are<br/>Indications that this development will continue in the future. },
  author       = {Ståhl, Agneta},
  issn         = {0361-1981},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {35--38},
  publisher    = {Transportation Research Board, Washington DC, USA},
  series       = {Transportation Research Record},
  title        = {Special Transportation Service in Sweden – Involvement of Private Operators.},
  volume       = {1170},
  year         = {1987},
}