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Desecuritisation of water and the technocratic turn in peacebuilding

Aggestam, Karin LU (2015) In International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 15(3). p.327-340
Abstract
This article addresses the research gap of water desecuritisation and advances an interdisciplinary approach within the issue area of peacebuilding. It draws upon three strands of research: security, peacebuilding and transboundary water management. The article examines three core questions: (1) how is desecuritisation conceptualised and understood in theory as well as within the context of water development; (2) in what ways are water conflict addressed within the liberal peacebuilding paradigm; and (3) what are the roles and implications of technocracy in resolving conflict and building peace? The article conducts a conceptual scoping, which critically probes what desecuritisation and peacebuilding do politically in the water sector. It... (More)
This article addresses the research gap of water desecuritisation and advances an interdisciplinary approach within the issue area of peacebuilding. It draws upon three strands of research: security, peacebuilding and transboundary water management. The article examines three core questions: (1) how is desecuritisation conceptualised and understood in theory as well as within the context of water development; (2) in what ways are water conflict addressed within the liberal peacebuilding paradigm; and (3) what are the roles and implications of technocracy in resolving conflict and building peace? The article conducts a conceptual scoping, which critically probes what desecuritisation and peacebuilding do politically in the water sector. It draws empirical illustrations from the Israeli-Palestinian water conflict where water is securitised while major peacebuilding efforts have been made to desecuritise the conflict. It concludes that technical blueprints may run the risk of depoliticising conflict dynamics, which contradicts the normative assumption about desecuritisation as a return to normal politics. Moreover, the technocratic turn in peacebuilding practices have empowered certain actors, who act as the "new" peacemakers while others are marginalised. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Conflict, Politics, Water, Technocracy, Peacebuilding, Desecuritisation
in
International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics
volume
15
issue
3
pages
327 - 340
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000360192800007
  • scopus:84940439331
ISSN
1573-1553
DOI
10.1007/s10784-015-9281-x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a0dfb2b8-fb11-4c87-96c6-5bbea61fb9d8 (old id 7964844)
date added to LUP
2015-09-22 12:42:40
date last changed
2017-05-28 03:18:48
@article{a0dfb2b8-fb11-4c87-96c6-5bbea61fb9d8,
  abstract     = {This article addresses the research gap of water desecuritisation and advances an interdisciplinary approach within the issue area of peacebuilding. It draws upon three strands of research: security, peacebuilding and transboundary water management. The article examines three core questions: (1) how is desecuritisation conceptualised and understood in theory as well as within the context of water development; (2) in what ways are water conflict addressed within the liberal peacebuilding paradigm; and (3) what are the roles and implications of technocracy in resolving conflict and building peace? The article conducts a conceptual scoping, which critically probes what desecuritisation and peacebuilding do politically in the water sector. It draws empirical illustrations from the Israeli-Palestinian water conflict where water is securitised while major peacebuilding efforts have been made to desecuritise the conflict. It concludes that technical blueprints may run the risk of depoliticising conflict dynamics, which contradicts the normative assumption about desecuritisation as a return to normal politics. Moreover, the technocratic turn in peacebuilding practices have empowered certain actors, who act as the "new" peacemakers while others are marginalised.},
  author       = {Aggestam, Karin},
  issn         = {1573-1553},
  keyword      = {Israeli-Palestinian conflict,Conflict,Politics,Water,Technocracy,Peacebuilding,Desecuritisation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {327--340},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics},
  title        = {Desecuritisation of water and the technocratic turn in peacebuilding},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10784-015-9281-x},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2015},
}