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Vicariance and marine migration in continental island populations of a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal forest

Duryea, Katie LU ; Zamudio, K. R. and Brasileiro, C. A. (2015) In Heredity 115(3). p.225-234
Abstract
The theory of island biogeography is most often studied in the context of oceanic islands where all island inhabitants are descendants from founding events involving migration from mainland source populations. Far fewer studies have considered predictions of island biogeography in the case of continental islands, where island formation typically splits continuous populations and thus vicariance also contributes to the diversity of island populations. We examined one such case on continental islands in southeastern Brazil, to determine how classic island biogeography predictions and past vicariance explain the population genetic diversity of Thoropa taophora, a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal Forest. We used nuclear microsatellite... (More)
The theory of island biogeography is most often studied in the context of oceanic islands where all island inhabitants are descendants from founding events involving migration from mainland source populations. Far fewer studies have considered predictions of island biogeography in the case of continental islands, where island formation typically splits continuous populations and thus vicariance also contributes to the diversity of island populations. We examined one such case on continental islands in southeastern Brazil, to determine how classic island biogeography predictions and past vicariance explain the population genetic diversity of Thoropa taophora, a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal Forest. We used nuclear microsatellite markers to examine the genetic diversity of coastal and island populations of this species. We found that island isolation has a role in shaping the genetic diversity of continental island species, with island populations being significantly less diverse than coastal populations. However, area of the island and distance from coast had no significant effect on genetic diversity. We also found no significant differences between migration among coastal populations and migration to and from islands. We discuss how vicariance and the effects of continued migration between coastal and island populations interact to shape evolutionary patterns on continental islands. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Heredity
volume
115
issue
3
pages
225 - 234
publisher
Macmillan
external identifiers
  • wos:000359458400006
  • scopus:84939262841
ISSN
1365-2540
DOI
10.1038/hdy.2015.31
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8d7eb618-9293-4771-b3ff-e4f8c1f0e4a9 (old id 7972565)
date added to LUP
2015-09-23 15:19:47
date last changed
2017-06-25 03:11:39
@article{8d7eb618-9293-4771-b3ff-e4f8c1f0e4a9,
  abstract     = {The theory of island biogeography is most often studied in the context of oceanic islands where all island inhabitants are descendants from founding events involving migration from mainland source populations. Far fewer studies have considered predictions of island biogeography in the case of continental islands, where island formation typically splits continuous populations and thus vicariance also contributes to the diversity of island populations. We examined one such case on continental islands in southeastern Brazil, to determine how classic island biogeography predictions and past vicariance explain the population genetic diversity of Thoropa taophora, a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal Forest. We used nuclear microsatellite markers to examine the genetic diversity of coastal and island populations of this species. We found that island isolation has a role in shaping the genetic diversity of continental island species, with island populations being significantly less diverse than coastal populations. However, area of the island and distance from coast had no significant effect on genetic diversity. We also found no significant differences between migration among coastal populations and migration to and from islands. We discuss how vicariance and the effects of continued migration between coastal and island populations interact to shape evolutionary patterns on continental islands.},
  author       = {Duryea, Katie and Zamudio, K. R. and Brasileiro, C. A.},
  issn         = {1365-2540},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {225--234},
  publisher    = {Macmillan},
  series       = {Heredity},
  title        = {Vicariance and marine migration in continental island populations of a frog endemic to the Atlantic Coastal forest},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/hdy.2015.31},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2015},
}