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Carbon pools and fluxes in a Tibetan alpine Kobresia pygmaea pasture partitioned by coupled eddy-covariance measurements and 13CO2 pulse labeling

Ingrisch, Johannes; Biermann, Tobias; Seeber, Elke; Leipold, Thomas; Li, Maoshan; Ma, Yaoming; Xu, Xingliang; Miehe, Georg; Guggenberger, Georg and Foken, Thomas, et al. (2015) In Science of the Total Environment 505. p.1213-1224
Abstract
The Tibetan highlands host the largest alpine grassland ecosystems worldwide, bearing soils that store substantial stocks of carbon (C) that are very sensitive to land use changes. This study focuses on the cycling of photoassimilated C within a Kobresia pygmaea pasture, the dominating ecosystems on the Tibetan highlands. We investigated short-term effects of grazing cessation and the role of the characteristic Kobresia root turf on C fluxes and belowground C turnover. By combining eddy-covariance measurements with 13CO2 pulse labeling we applied a powerful new approach to measure absolute fluxes of assimilates within and between various pools of the plant-soil-atmosphere system. The roots and soil each store roughly 50% of the overall C... (More)
The Tibetan highlands host the largest alpine grassland ecosystems worldwide, bearing soils that store substantial stocks of carbon (C) that are very sensitive to land use changes. This study focuses on the cycling of photoassimilated C within a Kobresia pygmaea pasture, the dominating ecosystems on the Tibetan highlands. We investigated short-term effects of grazing cessation and the role of the characteristic Kobresia root turf on C fluxes and belowground C turnover. By combining eddy-covariance measurements with 13CO2 pulse labeling we applied a powerful new approach to measure absolute fluxes of assimilates within and between various pools of the plant-soil-atmosphere system. The roots and soil each store roughly 50% of the overall C in the system (76 Mg C ha−1), with only a minor contribution from shoots, which is also expressed in the root:shoot ratio of 90. During June and July the pasture acted as a weak C sink with a strong uptake of approximately 2 g C m−2 d−1 in the first half of July. The root turf was the main compartment for the turnover of

photoassimilates, with a subset of highly dynamic roots (mean residence time 20 days), and plays a key role for the C cycling and C storage in this ecosystem. The short-termgrazing cessation only affected aboveground biomass but not ecosystem scale C exchange or assimilate allocation into roots and soil. (Less)
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subject
keywords
Alpine grassland, Carbon cycle, Land use changes, Grazing, Tibetan-Plateau
in
Science of the Total Environment
volume
505
pages
1213 - 1224
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84915746497
ISSN
1879-1026
DOI
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.10.082
language
English
LU publication?
no
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9ed770b2-047b-4b40-97a9-e4bf4519e91a (old id 7991835)
date added to LUP
2016-01-13 11:29:29
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2017-06-04 03:09:08
@article{9ed770b2-047b-4b40-97a9-e4bf4519e91a,
  abstract     = {The Tibetan highlands host the largest alpine grassland ecosystems worldwide, bearing soils that store substantial stocks of carbon (C) that are very sensitive to land use changes. This study focuses on the cycling of photoassimilated C within a Kobresia pygmaea pasture, the dominating ecosystems on the Tibetan highlands. We investigated short-term effects of grazing cessation and the role of the characteristic Kobresia root turf on C fluxes and belowground C turnover. By combining eddy-covariance measurements with 13CO2 pulse labeling we applied a powerful new approach to measure absolute fluxes of assimilates within and between various pools of the plant-soil-atmosphere system. The roots and soil each store roughly 50% of the overall C in the system (76 Mg C ha−1), with only a minor contribution from shoots, which is also expressed in the root:shoot ratio of 90. During June and July the pasture acted as a weak C sink with a strong uptake of approximately 2 g C m−2 d−1 in the first half of July. The root turf was the main compartment for the turnover of<br/><br>
photoassimilates, with a subset of highly dynamic roots (mean residence time 20 days), and plays a key role for the C cycling and C storage in this ecosystem. The short-termgrazing cessation only affected aboveground biomass but not ecosystem scale C exchange or assimilate allocation into roots and soil.},
  author       = {Ingrisch, Johannes and Biermann, Tobias and Seeber, Elke and Leipold, Thomas and Li, Maoshan and Ma, Yaoming and Xu, Xingliang and Miehe, Georg and Guggenberger, Georg and Foken, Thomas and Kuzyakov, Yakov},
  issn         = {1879-1026},
  keyword      = {Alpine grassland,Carbon cycle,Land use changes,Grazing,Tibetan-Plateau},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1213--1224},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Science of the Total Environment},
  title        = {Carbon pools and fluxes in a Tibetan alpine <i>Kobresia pygmaea </i> pasture partitioned by coupled eddy-covariance measurements and <sup>13</sup>CO<sub>2</sub> pulse labeling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.10.082},
  volume       = {505},
  year         = {2015},
}