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Molecular identification of bacteria associated with filaments of Nodularia spumigena and their effect on the cyanobacterial growth

Salomon, P. S.; Janson, S. and Graneli, Edna LU (2003) In Harmful Algae 2(4). p.261-272
Abstract
Colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria frequently have bacteria associated with their extracellular mucus zone or more tightly attached to their cells surface. The toxin-producing cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena is an important component of the Baltic Sea plankton community, and its filaments are likely to provide a microenvironment suitable for the development of a particular bacteria flora. In the present work, 13 bacterial strains associated with filaments of N. spumigena from the Baltic Sea were isolated and identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Different bacterial lineages were found associated with the cyanobacterial filaments, including the alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacter and the division... (More)
Colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria frequently have bacteria associated with their extracellular mucus zone or more tightly attached to their cells surface. The toxin-producing cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena is an important component of the Baltic Sea plankton community, and its filaments are likely to provide a microenvironment suitable for the development of a particular bacteria flora. In the present work, 13 bacterial strains associated with filaments of N. spumigena from the Baltic Sea were isolated and identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Different bacterial lineages were found associated with the cyanobacterial filaments, including the alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacter and the division Firmicutes (Gram-positive bacteria). Several 16S rRNA gene sequences were not closely related to previously reported sequences of cultured bacteria from the Baltic Sea or to any other reported sequence. Conversely, sequences related to the gamma Proteobacter genus Shewanella, a group previously described in the Baltic Sea, were found among the isolates. The bacterial isolates were grown and added to cultures of exponentially growing N. spumigena. Five isolates, related to the alpha and gamma Proteobacter and Firmicutes, affected negatively the cyanobacterial growth, leading to a lower biomass yield up to 38% relative to controls with no bacteria addition. Five gamma Proteobacter-related strains had no effect on the cyanobacterial growth, while three strains related to Shewanella baltica had a positive effect. Although none of the bacterial isolates showed strong algicidal effect, the observed stimulatory and retarding effects on N. spumigena growth under culture conditions denotes the importance of the associated bacterial community for the dynamics of these cyanobacterial populations in nature. Moreover, several new taxa recovered in this study probably belong to species not yet described. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
categories
Higher Education
in
Harmful Algae
volume
2
issue
4
pages
261 - 272
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0242459914
ISSN
1878-1470
DOI
10.1016/s1568-9883(03)00045-3
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
9ac26a30-3667-4545-a414-e99c9726843d (old id 7994029)
date added to LUP
2015-09-29 13:07:57
date last changed
2018-06-10 03:48:52
@article{9ac26a30-3667-4545-a414-e99c9726843d,
  abstract     = {Colonial and filamentous cyanobacteria frequently have bacteria associated with their extracellular mucus zone or more tightly attached to their cells surface. The toxin-producing cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena is an important component of the Baltic Sea plankton community, and its filaments are likely to provide a microenvironment suitable for the development of a particular bacteria flora. In the present work, 13 bacterial strains associated with filaments of N. spumigena from the Baltic Sea were isolated and identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Different bacterial lineages were found associated with the cyanobacterial filaments, including the alpha, beta, and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacter and the division Firmicutes (Gram-positive bacteria). Several 16S rRNA gene sequences were not closely related to previously reported sequences of cultured bacteria from the Baltic Sea or to any other reported sequence. Conversely, sequences related to the gamma Proteobacter genus Shewanella, a group previously described in the Baltic Sea, were found among the isolates. The bacterial isolates were grown and added to cultures of exponentially growing N. spumigena. Five isolates, related to the alpha and gamma Proteobacter and Firmicutes, affected negatively the cyanobacterial growth, leading to a lower biomass yield up to 38% relative to controls with no bacteria addition. Five gamma Proteobacter-related strains had no effect on the cyanobacterial growth, while three strains related to Shewanella baltica had a positive effect. Although none of the bacterial isolates showed strong algicidal effect, the observed stimulatory and retarding effects on N. spumigena growth under culture conditions denotes the importance of the associated bacterial community for the dynamics of these cyanobacterial populations in nature. Moreover, several new taxa recovered in this study probably belong to species not yet described.},
  author       = {Salomon, P. S. and Janson, S. and Graneli, Edna},
  issn         = {1878-1470},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {261--272},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Harmful Algae},
  title        = {Molecular identification of bacteria associated with filaments of Nodularia spumigena and their effect on the cyanobacterial growth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1568-9883(03)00045-3},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2003},
}