Advanced

Speed reduction effects over distance of animal-vehicle collision countermeasures – a driving simulator study

Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Antonson, Hans LU and Ahlström, Christer (2018) In European Transport Research Review 10(2).
Abstract

Purpose: This study examined if speed reduction effects from animal-vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures are merely local or do extend to a wider area, and what implications the results have on road planning practice regarding AVCs. Methods: Twenty-five drivers drove repeatedly on a 9-km long road stretch in a high-fidelity driving simulator. The development of vehicle speed in the surrounding of an automatic speed camera, a wildlife warning sign and a radio message, were investigated in a full factorial within-subject experiment. The factors wildlife fence (with/without) and forest (dense/open landscape) were also included. Results: The radio warning message had the largest influence on vehicle speed with a speed reduction of 8 km/h... (More)

Purpose: This study examined if speed reduction effects from animal-vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures are merely local or do extend to a wider area, and what implications the results have on road planning practice regarding AVCs. Methods: Twenty-five drivers drove repeatedly on a 9-km long road stretch in a high-fidelity driving simulator. The development of vehicle speed in the surrounding of an automatic speed camera, a wildlife warning sign and a radio message, were investigated in a full factorial within-subject experiment. The factors wildlife fence (with/without) and forest (dense/open landscape) were also included. Results: The radio warning message had the largest influence on vehicle speed with a speed reduction of 8 km/h that lasted beyond 1 km and 2 km after the implementation. Eighty-eight per cent of the drivers reported being made extra aware of AVC due to the radio message, which was also associated with stress, insecurity and unsafety. The warning sign reduced vehicle speed by 1.5 km/h, but speed reductions were not significantly reduced 1 km after the implementation. Only 8 % of the drivers felt insecure/unsafe after passing the wildlife warning sign, explaining its limited impact on speed. There were no main effects of the automatic speed camera on vehicle speed at longer distances after implementation. Conclusions: We recommend that AVC countermeasures should be of various design, occur at various segments along the road, and preferably be adaptive and geo-localized to minimize habituation effects on drivers.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accidents, AVC, Countermeasures, Mitigation measures, Planning, Traffic safety
in
European Transport Research Review
volume
10
issue
2
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • scopus:85052734562
ISSN
1867-0717
DOI
10.1186/s12544-018-0314-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7a10f117-92b3-4c12-acc2-dd30e23d41ca
date added to LUP
2018-09-27 12:15:45
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:27:59
@article{7a10f117-92b3-4c12-acc2-dd30e23d41ca,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: This study examined if speed reduction effects from animal-vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures are merely local or do extend to a wider area, and what implications the results have on road planning practice regarding AVCs. Methods: Twenty-five drivers drove repeatedly on a 9-km long road stretch in a high-fidelity driving simulator. The development of vehicle speed in the surrounding of an automatic speed camera, a wildlife warning sign and a radio message, were investigated in a full factorial within-subject experiment. The factors wildlife fence (with/without) and forest (dense/open landscape) were also included. Results: The radio warning message had the largest influence on vehicle speed with a speed reduction of 8 km/h that lasted beyond 1 km and 2 km after the implementation. Eighty-eight per cent of the drivers reported being made extra aware of AVC due to the radio message, which was also associated with stress, insecurity and unsafety. The warning sign reduced vehicle speed by 1.5 km/h, but speed reductions were not significantly reduced 1 km after the implementation. Only 8 % of the drivers felt insecure/unsafe after passing the wildlife warning sign, explaining its limited impact on speed. There were no main effects of the automatic speed camera on vehicle speed at longer distances after implementation. Conclusions: We recommend that AVC countermeasures should be of various design, occur at various segments along the road, and preferably be adaptive and geo-localized to minimize habituation effects on drivers.</p>},
  articleno    = {40},
  author       = {Jägerbrand, Annika K. and Antonson, Hans and Ahlström, Christer},
  issn         = {1867-0717},
  keyword      = {Accidents,AVC,Countermeasures,Mitigation measures,Planning,Traffic safety},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {2},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {European Transport Research Review},
  title        = {Speed reduction effects over distance of animal-vehicle collision countermeasures – a driving simulator study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12544-018-0314-8},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2018},
}