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Housing accessibility problems for people with Parkinson's disease

Slaug, B. LU ; Iwarsson, S. LU ; Ayala, J. A. and Nilsson, M. H. LU (2017) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 136(5). p.501-510
Abstract

Objectives: Promoting accessible housing for all citizens is high on the political agenda. Knowledge is, however, limited regarding housing accessibility problems for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The objectives were to investigate housing accessibility problems among people with PD at different stages of disease severity and to analyze the potential impact of improved functional ability on accessibility problems. Materials and methods: The study included 253 participants with PD (61% men; mean age 70 years). Disease severity was assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) I-V stages: HY I, n=50; II, n=73, III, n=66; IV-V, n=64. Using the Housing Enabler (HE) instrument, accessibility problems were investigated by combining assessments... (More)

Objectives: Promoting accessible housing for all citizens is high on the political agenda. Knowledge is, however, limited regarding housing accessibility problems for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The objectives were to investigate housing accessibility problems among people with PD at different stages of disease severity and to analyze the potential impact of improved functional ability on accessibility problems. Materials and methods: The study included 253 participants with PD (61% men; mean age 70 years). Disease severity was assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) I-V stages: HY I, n=50; II, n=73, III, n=66; IV-V, n=64. Using the Housing Enabler (HE) instrument, accessibility problems were investigated by combining assessments of the person's functional capacity with assessments of physical barriers in the housing environment into a person-environment fit measure (HE-score). To analyze potential impact of improved functional ability on housing accessibility problems, data simulation was applied. Results: HE-scores differed significantly (P<.001) in relation to HY stages. Overall balance problems explained 22% and walking devices 17% of the HE-scores, whereas environmental barriers contributed to a lesser extent. The environmental barriers generating the most HE-scores were "no grab bar at shower/bath/toilet" and "wall-mounted cupboards and shelves placed high". A simulation of improved balance significantly (P<.001) lowered the HE-scores in all HY stages. Conclusions: The results suggest that actions targeting balance problems and dependence on walking devices have the greatest potential for reducing housing accessibility problems for people with PD. The study also details environmental barriers that need specific attention when providing housing adaptation services.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accessibility, Assistive devices, Housing, Parkinson's disease, Physical barriers, Postural balance
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
volume
136
issue
5
pages
501 - 510
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017564074
  • wos:000415864000018
ISSN
0001-6314
DOI
10.1111/ane.12763
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7be839c6-bb0c-4f5f-941e-08ce4aa5ed73
date added to LUP
2017-05-05 11:03:24
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:25:59
@article{7be839c6-bb0c-4f5f-941e-08ce4aa5ed73,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: Promoting accessible housing for all citizens is high on the political agenda. Knowledge is, however, limited regarding housing accessibility problems for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The objectives were to investigate housing accessibility problems among people with PD at different stages of disease severity and to analyze the potential impact of improved functional ability on accessibility problems. Materials and methods: The study included 253 participants with PD (61% men; mean age 70 years). Disease severity was assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) I-V stages: HY I, n=50; II, n=73, III, n=66; IV-V, n=64. Using the Housing Enabler (HE) instrument, accessibility problems were investigated by combining assessments of the person's functional capacity with assessments of physical barriers in the housing environment into a person-environment fit measure (HE-score). To analyze potential impact of improved functional ability on housing accessibility problems, data simulation was applied. Results: HE-scores differed significantly (P&lt;.001) in relation to HY stages. Overall balance problems explained 22% and walking devices 17% of the HE-scores, whereas environmental barriers contributed to a lesser extent. The environmental barriers generating the most HE-scores were "no grab bar at shower/bath/toilet" and "wall-mounted cupboards and shelves placed high". A simulation of improved balance significantly (P&lt;.001) lowered the HE-scores in all HY stages. Conclusions: The results suggest that actions targeting balance problems and dependence on walking devices have the greatest potential for reducing housing accessibility problems for people with PD. The study also details environmental barriers that need specific attention when providing housing adaptation services.</p>},
  author       = {Slaug, B. and Iwarsson, S. and Ayala, J. A. and Nilsson, M. H.},
  issn         = {0001-6314},
  keyword      = {Accessibility,Assistive devices,Housing,Parkinson's disease,Physical barriers,Postural balance},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {501--510},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Housing accessibility problems for people with Parkinson's disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12763},
  volume       = {136},
  year         = {2017},
}