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The change of longitudinal relaxation rate in oxygen enhanced pulmonary MRI depends on age and BMI but not diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide in healthy never-smokers

Kindvall, Simon LU ; Diaz, Sandra LU ; Svensson, Jonas LU ; Wollmer, Per LU and Olsson, Lars E. LU (2017) In PLoS ONE 12(5).
Abstract

Objective: Oxygen enhanced pulmonary MRI is a promising modality for functional lung studies and has been applied to a wide range of pulmonary conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oxygen enhancement effect in the lungs of healthy, never-smokers, in light of a previously established relationship between oxygen enhancement and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide in the lung (DL,CO) in patients with lung disease. Methods: In 30 healthy never-smoking volunteers, an inversion recovery with gradient echo read-out (Snapshot-FLASH) was used to quantify the difference in longitudinal relaxation rate, while breathing air and 100% oxygen, ΔR1, at 1.5 Tesla. Measurements were performed under multiple tidal... (More)

Objective: Oxygen enhanced pulmonary MRI is a promising modality for functional lung studies and has been applied to a wide range of pulmonary conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oxygen enhancement effect in the lungs of healthy, never-smokers, in light of a previously established relationship between oxygen enhancement and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide in the lung (DL,CO) in patients with lung disease. Methods: In 30 healthy never-smoking volunteers, an inversion recovery with gradient echo read-out (Snapshot-FLASH) was used to quantify the difference in longitudinal relaxation rate, while breathing air and 100% oxygen, ΔR1, at 1.5 Tesla. Measurements were performed under multiple tidal inspiration breath-holds. Results: In single parameter linear models, ΔR1 exhibit a significant correlation with age (p = 0.003) and BMI (p = 0.0004), but not DL,CO (p = 0.33). Stepwise linear regression of ΔR1 yields an optimized model including an age-BMI interaction term. Conclusion: In this healthy, never-smoking cohort, age and BMI are both predictors of the change in MRI longitudinal relaxation rate when breathing oxygen. However, DL,CO does not show a significant correlation with the oxygen enhancement. This is possibly because oxygen transfer in the lung is not diffusion limited at rest in healthy individuals. This work stresses the importance of using a physiological model to understand results from oxygen enhanced MRI.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
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publication status
published
subject
in
PLoS ONE
volume
12
issue
5
publisher
Public Library of Science
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019091246
  • wos:000401314300151
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0177670
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7de76890-940b-4028-a0c7-af27ea0c9154
date added to LUP
2017-06-08 10:57:01
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:06:39
@article{7de76890-940b-4028-a0c7-af27ea0c9154,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: Oxygen enhanced pulmonary MRI is a promising modality for functional lung studies and has been applied to a wide range of pulmonary conditions. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oxygen enhancement effect in the lungs of healthy, never-smokers, in light of a previously established relationship between oxygen enhancement and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide in the lung (D<sub>L,CO</sub>) in patients with lung disease. Methods: In 30 healthy never-smoking volunteers, an inversion recovery with gradient echo read-out (Snapshot-FLASH) was used to quantify the difference in longitudinal relaxation rate, while breathing air and 100% oxygen, ΔR1, at 1.5 Tesla. Measurements were performed under multiple tidal inspiration breath-holds. Results: In single parameter linear models, ΔR1 exhibit a significant correlation with age (p = 0.003) and BMI (p = 0.0004), but not D<sub>L,CO</sub> (p = 0.33). Stepwise linear regression of ΔR1 yields an optimized model including an age-BMI interaction term. Conclusion: In this healthy, never-smoking cohort, age and BMI are both predictors of the change in MRI longitudinal relaxation rate when breathing oxygen. However, D<sub>L,CO</sub> does not show a significant correlation with the oxygen enhancement. This is possibly because oxygen transfer in the lung is not diffusion limited at rest in healthy individuals. This work stresses the importance of using a physiological model to understand results from oxygen enhanced MRI.</p>},
  articleno    = {e0177670},
  author       = {Kindvall, Simon and Diaz, Sandra and Svensson, Jonas and Wollmer, Per and Olsson, Lars E.},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {5},
  publisher    = {Public Library of Science},
  series       = {PLoS ONE},
  title        = {The change of longitudinal relaxation rate in oxygen enhanced pulmonary MRI depends on age and BMI but not diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide in healthy never-smokers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0177670},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}