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How badly did it hit? Self-assessed emotional shock upon prostate cancer diagnosis and psychological well-being : a follow-up at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery

Stinesen Kollberg, Karin; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis; Hugosson, Jonas; Wiklund, Peter; Bjartell, Anders LU ; Carlsson, Stefan; Stranne, Johan; Haglind, Eva and Steineck, Gunnar (2017) In Acta Oncologica 56(7). p.984-990
Abstract

Background: We were interested in examining if there was a link between self-assessed emotional shock by prostate cancer diagnosis and psychological well-being at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Material and methods: Information was derived from patients participating in the LAPAroscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open (LAPPRO) trial, Sweden. We analyzed the association between self-assessed emotional shock upon diagnosis and psychological well-being by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 2426 patients (75%) reported self-assessed emotional shock by the prostate cancer diagnosis. Median age of study participants was 63. There was an association between emotional shock and low psychological well-being after surgery: adjusted... (More)

Background: We were interested in examining if there was a link between self-assessed emotional shock by prostate cancer diagnosis and psychological well-being at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Material and methods: Information was derived from patients participating in the LAPAroscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open (LAPPRO) trial, Sweden. We analyzed the association between self-assessed emotional shock upon diagnosis and psychological well-being by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 2426 patients (75%) reported self-assessed emotional shock by the prostate cancer diagnosis. Median age of study participants was 63. There was an association between emotional shock and low psychological well-being after surgery: adjusted OR 1.7: (95% confidence interval [CI]), 1.4–2.1 at 3 months; adjusted OR 1.3: CI, 1.1–1.7 at 12 months, and adjusted OR 1.4: CI, 1.1–1.8 at 24 months. Among self-assessed emotionally shocked patients, low self-esteem, anxiety, and having no one to confide in were factors more strongly related with low psychological well-being over time. Conclusion: Experiencing self-assessed emotional shock by prostate cancer diagnosis may be associated with low psychological well-being for up to two years after surgery. Future research may address this high rate of self-assessed emotional shock after diagnosis with the aim to intervene to avoid this negative experience to become drawn out.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oncologica
volume
56
issue
7
pages
7 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85015664920
  • wos:000401721200013
ISSN
0284-186X
DOI
10.1080/0284186X.2017.1300320
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7e1da103-414a-4df7-a26c-1994cb7bd355
date added to LUP
2017-07-26 09:19:19
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:13:09
@article{7e1da103-414a-4df7-a26c-1994cb7bd355,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: We were interested in examining if there was a link between self-assessed emotional shock by prostate cancer diagnosis and psychological well-being at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Material and methods: Information was derived from patients participating in the LAPAroscopic Prostatectomy Robot Open (LAPPRO) trial, Sweden. We analyzed the association between self-assessed emotional shock upon diagnosis and psychological well-being by calculating odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 2426 patients (75%) reported self-assessed emotional shock by the prostate cancer diagnosis. Median age of study participants was 63. There was an association between emotional shock and low psychological well-being after surgery: adjusted OR 1.7: (95% confidence interval [CI]), 1.4–2.1 at 3 months; adjusted OR 1.3: CI, 1.1–1.7 at 12 months, and adjusted OR 1.4: CI, 1.1–1.8 at 24 months. Among self-assessed emotionally shocked patients, low self-esteem, anxiety, and having no one to confide in were factors more strongly related with low psychological well-being over time. Conclusion: Experiencing self-assessed emotional shock by prostate cancer diagnosis may be associated with low psychological well-being for up to two years after surgery. Future research may address this high rate of self-assessed emotional shock after diagnosis with the aim to intervene to avoid this negative experience to become drawn out.</p>},
  author       = {Stinesen Kollberg, Karin and Wilderäng, Ulrica and Thorsteinsdottir, Thordis and Hugosson, Jonas and Wiklund, Peter and Bjartell, Anders and Carlsson, Stefan and Stranne, Johan and Haglind, Eva and Steineck, Gunnar},
  issn         = {0284-186X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {984--990},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oncologica},
  title        = {How badly did it hit? Self-assessed emotional shock upon prostate cancer diagnosis and psychological well-being : a follow-up at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2017.1300320},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2017},
}