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Vanilloid receptors on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves mediate relaxation to methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arteries

Ralevic, V. ; Kendall, D. A. ; Randall, M. D. ; Zygmunt, P. M. LU ; Movahed, P. and Högestätt, E. D. LU (2000) In British Journal of Pharmacology 130(7). p.1483-1488
Abstract

1. In the present study, the vasodilator actions of methanandamide and capsaicin in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments were investigated. 2. Methanandamide elicited concentration-dependent relaxations of preconstricted mesenteric arterial beds (pEC 50 = 6.0 ± 0.1, E(max) = 87 ± 3%) and arterial segments (pEC 50 = 6.4 ± 0.1, E(max) = 93 ± 3%). 3. In arterial beds, in vitro capsaicin pre-treatment blocked vasorelaxation to 1 and 3 μM methanandamide, and reduced to 12 ± 7% vasorelaxation to 10 μM methanandamide. Methanandamide failed to... (More)

1. In the present study, the vasodilator actions of methanandamide and capsaicin in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments were investigated. 2. Methanandamide elicited concentration-dependent relaxations of preconstricted mesenteric arterial beds (pEC 50 = 6.0 ± 0.1, E(max) = 87 ± 3%) and arterial segments (pEC 50 = 6.4 ± 0.1, E(max) = 93 ± 3%). 3. In arterial beds, in vitro capsaicin pre-treatment blocked vasorelaxation to 1 and 3 μM methanandamide, and reduced to 12 ± 7% vasorelaxation to 10 μM methanandamide. Methanandamide failed to relax arterial segments pre-treated in vitro with capsaicin. 4. In arterial beds from rats treated as neonates with capsaicin to cause destruction of primary afferent nerves, methanandamide at 1 and 3 μM did not evoke vasorelaxation, and relaxation at 10 μM methanandamide was reduced to 26 ± 4%. 5. Ruthenium red (0.1 μM), an inhibitor of vanilloid responses, attenuated vasorelaxation to methanandamide in arterial beds (pEC 50 = 5.6 ± 0.1, E(max) = 89 ± 1%). Ruthenium red at 1 μM abolished the response to 1 μM methanandamide, and greatly attenuated relaxation at 3 and 10 μM methanandamide in arterial beds. In arterial segments, ruthenium red (0.15 μM) blocked vasorelaxation to methanandamide, but not to CGRP. 6. In arterial segments, the vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 μM) inhibited, and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist CGRP 8-37 (3 μM) abolished, methanandamide-induced relaxations. CGRP 8-37 , but not capsazepine, attenuated significantly relaxation to exogenous CGRP. 7. These data show that capsaicin and ruthenium red attenuate vasorelaxation to methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments. In addition, CGRP 8-37 and capsazepine antagonize responses to methanandamide in mesenteric arterial segments. In conclusion, vanilloid receptors on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves play an important role in the vasorelaxant action of methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments.

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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cannabinoids, Capsaicin, Methanandamide, Primary afferent nerves, Rat mesenteric arterial bed, Ruthenium red, Vanilloid receptors
in
British Journal of Pharmacology
volume
130
issue
7
pages
6 pages
publisher
The British Pharmacological Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033853422
ISSN
0007-1188
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjp.0703456
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
7f0ae8cc-03a4-4e30-a414-3f57dc9eabb4
date added to LUP
2019-05-31 21:36:41
date last changed
2019-12-03 02:12:02
@article{7f0ae8cc-03a4-4e30-a414-3f57dc9eabb4,
  abstract     = {<p>                            1. In the present study, the vasodilator actions of methanandamide and capsaicin in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments were investigated. 2. Methanandamide elicited concentration-dependent relaxations of preconstricted mesenteric arterial beds (pEC                            <sub>50</sub>                             = 6.0 ± 0.1, E(max) = 87 ± 3%) and arterial segments (pEC                            <sub>50</sub>                             = 6.4 ± 0.1, E(max) = 93 ± 3%). 3. In arterial beds, in vitro capsaicin pre-treatment blocked vasorelaxation to 1 and 3 μM methanandamide, and reduced to 12 ± 7% vasorelaxation to 10 μM methanandamide. Methanandamide failed to relax arterial segments pre-treated in vitro with capsaicin. 4. In arterial beds from rats treated as neonates with capsaicin to cause destruction of primary afferent nerves, methanandamide at 1 and 3 μM did not evoke vasorelaxation, and relaxation at 10 μM methanandamide was reduced to 26 ± 4%. 5. Ruthenium red (0.1 μM), an inhibitor of vanilloid responses, attenuated vasorelaxation to methanandamide in arterial beds (pEC                            <sub>50</sub>                             = 5.6 ± 0.1, E(max) = 89 ± 1%). Ruthenium red at 1 μM abolished the response to 1 μM methanandamide, and greatly attenuated relaxation at 3 and 10 μM methanandamide in arterial beds. In arterial segments, ruthenium red (0.15 μM) blocked vasorelaxation to methanandamide, but not to CGRP. 6. In arterial segments, the vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (1 μM) inhibited, and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist CGRP                            <sub>8-37</sub>                             (3 μM) abolished, methanandamide-induced relaxations. CGRP                            <sub>8-37</sub>                            , but not capsazepine, attenuated significantly relaxation to exogenous CGRP. 7. These data show that capsaicin and ruthenium red attenuate vasorelaxation to methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments. In addition, CGRP                            <sub>8-37</sub>                             and capsazepine antagonize responses to methanandamide in mesenteric arterial segments. In conclusion, vanilloid receptors on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves play an important role in the vasorelaxant action of methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arterial segments.                        </p>},
  author       = {Ralevic, V. and Kendall, D. A. and Randall, M. D. and Zygmunt, P. M. and Movahed, P. and Högestätt, E. D.},
  issn         = {0007-1188},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1483--1488},
  publisher    = {The British Pharmacological Society},
  series       = {British Journal of Pharmacology},
  title        = {Vanilloid receptors on capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves mediate relaxation to methanandamide in the rat isolated mesenteric arterial bed and small mesenteric arteries},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjp.0703456},
  doi          = {10.1038/sj.bjp.0703456},
  volume       = {130},
  year         = {2000},
}