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Risk factors for recurrence in depression in the Lundby population, 1947–1997

Nöbbelin, Linnéa LU ; Bogren, Mats LU ; Mattisson, Cecilia LU and Brådvik, Louise LU (2018) In Journal of Affective Disorders 288. p.125-131
Abstract
Background

Depression is a common disorder in both men and women, and the recurrence rate is high. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence in depression in the Lundby Study.
Methods

The Lundby Study is a community-based longitudinal study with focus on mental health. The study started in 1947 and three follow-ups have been carried out since, the last one in 1997. The population consists of 3563 subjects. Data from 508 subjects afflicted by depression was gathered. Premorbid factors (gender, socioeconomic status, marital status, personality and heredity) and factors related to the first depressive episode (age, degree of impairment and melancholic depression) were investigated regarding their... (More)
Background

Depression is a common disorder in both men and women, and the recurrence rate is high. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence in depression in the Lundby Study.
Methods

The Lundby Study is a community-based longitudinal study with focus on mental health. The study started in 1947 and three follow-ups have been carried out since, the last one in 1997. The population consists of 3563 subjects. Data from 508 subjects afflicted by depression was gathered. Premorbid factors (gender, socioeconomic status, marital status, personality and heredity) and factors related to the first depressive episode (age, degree of impairment and melancholic depression) were investigated regarding their influence on the risk for recurrence in depression. Multiple logistic regression was used in the calculations.
Results

Risk factors associated with recurrent depression were melancholic depression at first onset (OR 3.52 [95% CI 1.62–7.66, p < 0.001]), young age as compared to old age at first onset (OR 0.51 [95% CI 0.28–0.92, p = 0.03]) and a premorbid nervous/tense personality (OR 1.77 [95% CI 1.22–2.56, p < 0.01]). Demographic factors, including gender, had no effect on the odds of recurrence.
Limitations

The Lundby Study spans over 50 years, making the results vulnerable to changes in diagnostic regimes and recall bias.
Conclusion

Melancholia at onset, regardless of severity of symptoms, had the greatest impact on the risk of recurrence in depression in the Lundby Study. Information about risk factors for recurrence in depression are useful in offering effective preventive measures in the form of psychotropic drugs and psychotherapy, and deciding the length of follow-up. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
depression
in
Journal of Affective Disorders
volume
288
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85042333797
ISSN
1573-2517
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7fb922ed-2137-45d8-bbde-25865a50a243
date added to LUP
2018-01-05 18:39:31
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:51:08
@article{7fb922ed-2137-45d8-bbde-25865a50a243,
  abstract     = {Background<br>
<br>
Depression is a common disorder in both men and women, and the recurrence rate is high. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for recurrence in depression in the Lundby Study.<br>
Methods<br>
<br>
The Lundby Study is a community-based longitudinal study with focus on mental health. The study started in 1947 and three follow-ups have been carried out since, the last one in 1997. The population consists of 3563 subjects. Data from 508 subjects afflicted by depression was gathered. Premorbid factors (gender, socioeconomic status, marital status, personality and heredity) and factors related to the first depressive episode (age, degree of impairment and melancholic depression) were investigated regarding their influence on the risk for recurrence in depression. Multiple logistic regression was used in the calculations.<br>
Results<br>
<br>
Risk factors associated with recurrent depression were melancholic depression at first onset (OR 3.52 [95% CI 1.62–7.66, p &lt; 0.001]), young age as compared to old age at first onset (OR 0.51 [95% CI 0.28–0.92, p = 0.03]) and a premorbid nervous/tense personality (OR 1.77 [95% CI 1.22–2.56, p &lt; 0.01]). Demographic factors, including gender, had no effect on the odds of recurrence.<br>
Limitations<br>
<br>
The Lundby Study spans over 50 years, making the results vulnerable to changes in diagnostic regimes and recall bias.<br>
Conclusion<br>
<br>
Melancholia at onset, regardless of severity of symptoms, had the greatest impact on the risk of recurrence in depression in the Lundby Study. Information about risk factors for recurrence in depression are useful in offering effective preventive measures in the form of psychotropic drugs and psychotherapy, and deciding the length of follow-up.},
  author       = {Nöbbelin, Linnéa and Bogren, Mats and Mattisson, Cecilia and Brådvik, Louise},
  issn         = {1573-2517},
  keyword      = {depression},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {125--131},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
  title        = {Risk factors for recurrence in depression in the Lundby population, 1947–1997},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {288},
  year         = {2018},
}