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Fetal growth and subsequent maternal risk of thyroid cancer.

Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2016) In International Journal of Cancer 138(5). p.1085-1093
Abstract
Thyroid cancer has peak incidence among women of reproductive age, and growth factors, which have procarcinogenic properties, may play an important etiologic role. However, the association between fetal growth rate during a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent risk of thyroid cancer has not been previously examined. We conducted a national cohort study of 1,837,634 mothers who had a total of 3,588,497 live-births in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for thyroid cancer incidence through 2009. There were 2,202 mothers subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 36.8 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for maternal age, height, weight, smoking, and sociodemographic factors, high fetal growth (birth weight standardized for... (More)
Thyroid cancer has peak incidence among women of reproductive age, and growth factors, which have procarcinogenic properties, may play an important etiologic role. However, the association between fetal growth rate during a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent risk of thyroid cancer has not been previously examined. We conducted a national cohort study of 1,837,634 mothers who had a total of 3,588,497 live-births in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for thyroid cancer incidence through 2009. There were 2,202 mothers subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 36.8 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for maternal age, height, weight, smoking, and sociodemographic factors, high fetal growth (birth weight standardized for gestational age and sex) was associated with a subsequent increased risk of thyroid cancer in the mother (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per additional 1 standard deviation, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09; P=0.02). Each 1,000 g increase in the infant's birth weight was associated with a 13% increase in the mother's subsequent risk of thyroid cancer (IRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22; P=0.001). These findings appeared to involve both papillary and follicular subtypes, and did not vary significantly by the mother's height, weight, or smoking status. In this large national cohort study, high fetal growth during a woman's pregnancy was independently associated with a subsequent increased risk of her developing thyroid cancer. If confirmed, these findings suggest an important role of maternal growth factors in the development of thyroid cancer, and potentially may help facilitate the identification of high-risk subgroups of women. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
138
issue
5
pages
1085 - 1093
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:26379007
  • wos:000369164700005
  • scopus:84955511070
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.29857
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
96317a82-bccf-4e64-b527-90ff3e9a79ca (old id 8038932)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26379007?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-10-03 19:43:07
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:30:43
@article{96317a82-bccf-4e64-b527-90ff3e9a79ca,
  abstract     = {Thyroid cancer has peak incidence among women of reproductive age, and growth factors, which have procarcinogenic properties, may play an important etiologic role. However, the association between fetal growth rate during a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent risk of thyroid cancer has not been previously examined. We conducted a national cohort study of 1,837,634 mothers who had a total of 3,588,497 live-births in Sweden in 1973-2008, followed up for thyroid cancer incidence through 2009. There were 2,202 mothers subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 36.8 million person-years of follow-up. After adjusting for maternal age, height, weight, smoking, and sociodemographic factors, high fetal growth (birth weight standardized for gestational age and sex) was associated with a subsequent increased risk of thyroid cancer in the mother (incidence rate ratio [IRR] per additional 1 standard deviation, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09; P=0.02). Each 1,000 g increase in the infant's birth weight was associated with a 13% increase in the mother's subsequent risk of thyroid cancer (IRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22; P=0.001). These findings appeared to involve both papillary and follicular subtypes, and did not vary significantly by the mother's height, weight, or smoking status. In this large national cohort study, high fetal growth during a woman's pregnancy was independently associated with a subsequent increased risk of her developing thyroid cancer. If confirmed, these findings suggest an important role of maternal growth factors in the development of thyroid cancer, and potentially may help facilitate the identification of high-risk subgroups of women. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Crump, Casey and Sundquist, Jan and Sieh, Weiva and Winkleby, Marilyn A and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1085--1093},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Fetal growth and subsequent maternal risk of thyroid cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29857},
  volume       = {138},
  year         = {2016},
}