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Does epigenetic dysregulation of pancreatic islets contribute to impaired insulin secretion and type 2 diabetes?

Dayeh, Tasnim LU and Ling, Charlotte LU (2015) In Biochemistry and Cell Biology 93(5). p.511-521
Abstract
β cell dysfunction is central to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D develops when β cells are not able to compensate for the increasing demand for insulin caused by insulin resistance. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in establishing and maintaining β cell identity and function in physiological conditions. On the other hand, epigenetic dysregulation can cause a loss of β cell identity, which is characterized by reduced expression of genes that are important for β cell function, ectopic expression of genes that are not supposed to be expressed in β cells, and loss of genetic imprinting. Consequently, this may lead to β cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. Risk factors that can cause... (More)
β cell dysfunction is central to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D develops when β cells are not able to compensate for the increasing demand for insulin caused by insulin resistance. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in establishing and maintaining β cell identity and function in physiological conditions. On the other hand, epigenetic dysregulation can cause a loss of β cell identity, which is characterized by reduced expression of genes that are important for β cell function, ectopic expression of genes that are not supposed to be expressed in β cells, and loss of genetic imprinting. Consequently, this may lead to β cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. Risk factors that can cause epigenetic dysregulation include parental obesity, an adverse intrauterine environment, hyperglycemia, lipotoxicity, aging, physical inactivity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. These risk factors can affect the epigenome at different time points throughout the lifetime of an individual and even before an individual is conceived. The plasticity of the epigenome enables it to change in response to environmental factors such as diet and exercise, and also makes the epigenome a good target for epigenetic drugs that may be used to enhance insulin secretion and potentially treat diabetes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biochemistry and Cell Biology
volume
93
issue
5
pages
511 - 521
publisher
Canadian Science Publishing, NRC Research Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:26369706
  • wos:000362179000011
  • scopus:84984868336
ISSN
1208-6002
DOI
10.1139/bcb-2015-0057
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cd6f3986-80af-4070-a472-134e68c8d98b (old id 8042100)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26369706?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-10-04 12:44:33
date last changed
2017-05-21 03:23:55
@article{cd6f3986-80af-4070-a472-134e68c8d98b,
  abstract     = {β cell dysfunction is central to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D develops when β cells are not able to compensate for the increasing demand for insulin caused by insulin resistance. Epigenetic modifications play an important role in establishing and maintaining β cell identity and function in physiological conditions. On the other hand, epigenetic dysregulation can cause a loss of β cell identity, which is characterized by reduced expression of genes that are important for β cell function, ectopic expression of genes that are not supposed to be expressed in β cells, and loss of genetic imprinting. Consequently, this may lead to β cell dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion. Risk factors that can cause epigenetic dysregulation include parental obesity, an adverse intrauterine environment, hyperglycemia, lipotoxicity, aging, physical inactivity, and mitochondrial dysfunction. These risk factors can affect the epigenome at different time points throughout the lifetime of an individual and even before an individual is conceived. The plasticity of the epigenome enables it to change in response to environmental factors such as diet and exercise, and also makes the epigenome a good target for epigenetic drugs that may be used to enhance insulin secretion and potentially treat diabetes.},
  author       = {Dayeh, Tasnim and Ling, Charlotte},
  issn         = {1208-6002},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {511--521},
  publisher    = {Canadian Science Publishing, NRC Research Press},
  series       = {Biochemistry and Cell Biology},
  title        = {Does epigenetic dysregulation of pancreatic islets contribute to impaired insulin secretion and type 2 diabetes?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/bcb-2015-0057},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {2015},
}