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Clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases.

Kimbung, Siker LU ; Loman, Niklas LU and Hedenfalk, Ingrid LU (2015) In Seminars in Cancer Biology 35. p.85-95
Abstract
Clinical oncology is advancing toward a more personalized treatment orientation, making the need to understand the biology of metastasis increasingly acute. Dissecting the complex molecular, genetic and clinical phenotypes underlying the processes involved in the development of metastatic disease, which remains the principal cause of cancer-related deaths, could lead to the identification of more effective prognostication and targeted approaches to prevent and treat metastases. The past decade has witnessed significant progress in the field of cancer metastasis research. Clinical and technological milestones have been reached which have tremendously enriched our understanding of the complex pathways undertaken by primary tumors to progress... (More)
Clinical oncology is advancing toward a more personalized treatment orientation, making the need to understand the biology of metastasis increasingly acute. Dissecting the complex molecular, genetic and clinical phenotypes underlying the processes involved in the development of metastatic disease, which remains the principal cause of cancer-related deaths, could lead to the identification of more effective prognostication and targeted approaches to prevent and treat metastases. The past decade has witnessed significant progress in the field of cancer metastasis research. Clinical and technological milestones have been reached which have tremendously enriched our understanding of the complex pathways undertaken by primary tumors to progress into lethal metastases and how some of these processes might be amenable to therapy. The aim of this review article is to highlight the recent advances toward unraveling the clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases. We focus on genes mediating breast cancer metastases and organ-specific tropism, and discuss gene signatures for prediction of metastatic disease. The challenges of translating this information into clinically applicable tools for improving the prognostication of the metastatic potential of a primary breast tumor, as well as for therapeutic interventions against latent and active metastatic disease are addressed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Seminars in Cancer Biology
volume
35
pages
85 - 95
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:26319607
  • wos:000366071600010
  • scopus:84948714131
ISSN
1096-3650
DOI
10.1016/j.semcancer.2015.08.009
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d40affef-2c52-4dda-a4aa-301248a16490 (old id 8043743)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26319607?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-10-08 17:50:24
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:09:44
@article{d40affef-2c52-4dda-a4aa-301248a16490,
  abstract     = {Clinical oncology is advancing toward a more personalized treatment orientation, making the need to understand the biology of metastasis increasingly acute. Dissecting the complex molecular, genetic and clinical phenotypes underlying the processes involved in the development of metastatic disease, which remains the principal cause of cancer-related deaths, could lead to the identification of more effective prognostication and targeted approaches to prevent and treat metastases. The past decade has witnessed significant progress in the field of cancer metastasis research. Clinical and technological milestones have been reached which have tremendously enriched our understanding of the complex pathways undertaken by primary tumors to progress into lethal metastases and how some of these processes might be amenable to therapy. The aim of this review article is to highlight the recent advances toward unraveling the clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases. We focus on genes mediating breast cancer metastases and organ-specific tropism, and discuss gene signatures for prediction of metastatic disease. The challenges of translating this information into clinically applicable tools for improving the prognostication of the metastatic potential of a primary breast tumor, as well as for therapeutic interventions against latent and active metastatic disease are addressed.},
  author       = {Kimbung, Siker and Loman, Niklas and Hedenfalk, Ingrid},
  issn         = {1096-3650},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {85--95},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Seminars in Cancer Biology},
  title        = {Clinical and molecular complexity of breast cancer metastases.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2015.08.009},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2015},
}