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Health and social service access among family caregivers of people with Parkinson's disease

Olsson, Yvonne; Clarén, Lena; Alvariza, Anette; Årestedt, Kristofer and Hagell, Peter (2016) In Journal of Parkinson's Disease 6(3). p.581-587
Abstract

Background: Being a family caregiver for a person with Parkinson s disease (PD) can negatively impact health and wellbeing, but it appears less clear to what extent caregivers health/social service needs are met. Objective: We explored the extent to which PD family caregivers experience sufficient access to health/social services, as compared to age-matched controls; and the associations between this and demographic and health-related variables. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 66 PD family caregivers and 79 age-matched control subjects including the SF-36 health survey, the Nottingham Health Profile Sleep section (NHP-Sleep), and questions regarding contacts with various health/social related services and whether these were... (More)

Background: Being a family caregiver for a person with Parkinson s disease (PD) can negatively impact health and wellbeing, but it appears less clear to what extent caregivers health/social service needs are met. Objective: We explored the extent to which PD family caregivers experience sufficient access to health/social services, as compared to age-matched controls; and the associations between this and demographic and health-related variables. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 66 PD family caregivers and 79 age-matched control subjects including the SF-36 health survey, the Nottingham Health Profile Sleep section (NHP-Sleep), and questions regarding contacts with various health/social related services and whether these were perceived as sufficient. Results: People reporting insufficient access (n = 29) were more often PD family caregivers than controls (83% vs. 37%), did more often have a disease of their own (79% vs. 46%), and reported poorer health according to the SF-36 and the NHPSleep. Being a PD family caregiver (OR, 8.90), reporting more pain (OR, 1.02) and having an own disease (OR, 3.46) were independently associated with insufficient health/social service access. Conclusions: Our results imply that those in greatest need for health/social services (i.e., those with poorer health, an own disease, and who are PD family caregivers) are those whose health/social service needs are least met. Larger studies are needed for firmer conclusions and regarding how unmet health/social service needs impacts caregiver health and wellbeing. Health/social service providers should not only focus on patients but also consider their family members needs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Caregivers, health, health services needs and demand, Parkinson disease
in
Journal of Parkinson's Disease
volume
6
issue
3
pages
7 pages
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84983751678
  • wos:000383803000012
ISSN
1877-7171
DOI
10.3233/JPD-160811
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
80537cf4-7ff7-4154-adf6-f8bb04140853
date added to LUP
2016-09-16 09:37:30
date last changed
2017-02-05 04:52:58
@article{80537cf4-7ff7-4154-adf6-f8bb04140853,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Being a family caregiver for a person with Parkinson s disease (PD) can negatively impact health and wellbeing, but it appears less clear to what extent caregivers health/social service needs are met. Objective: We explored the extent to which PD family caregivers experience sufficient access to health/social services, as compared to age-matched controls; and the associations between this and demographic and health-related variables. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 66 PD family caregivers and 79 age-matched control subjects including the SF-36 health survey, the Nottingham Health Profile Sleep section (NHP-Sleep), and questions regarding contacts with various health/social related services and whether these were perceived as sufficient. Results: People reporting insufficient access (n = 29) were more often PD family caregivers than controls (83% vs. 37%), did more often have a disease of their own (79% vs. 46%), and reported poorer health according to the SF-36 and the NHPSleep. Being a PD family caregiver (OR, 8.90), reporting more pain (OR, 1.02) and having an own disease (OR, 3.46) were independently associated with insufficient health/social service access. Conclusions: Our results imply that those in greatest need for health/social services (i.e., those with poorer health, an own disease, and who are PD family caregivers) are those whose health/social service needs are least met. Larger studies are needed for firmer conclusions and regarding how unmet health/social service needs impacts caregiver health and wellbeing. Health/social service providers should not only focus on patients but also consider their family members needs.</p>},
  author       = {Olsson, Yvonne and Clarén, Lena and Alvariza, Anette and Årestedt, Kristofer and Hagell, Peter},
  issn         = {1877-7171},
  keyword      = {Caregivers,health,health services needs and demand,Parkinson disease},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {581--587},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Parkinson's Disease},
  title        = {Health and social service access among family caregivers of people with Parkinson's disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JPD-160811},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}