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Nonconceptual content and the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge

Brinck, Ingar LU (1999) In Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22(5). p.760-761
Abstract
A subject may be in a state with nonconceptual content without having the concepts that describe the state. Nonconceptual content does not seem to be a clear-cut case of either implicit or explicit knowledge. It underlies a kind of practical knowledge that is not reducible to procedural knowledge, and is accessible to the subject and under voluntary control.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Behavioral and Brain Sciences
volume
22
issue
5
pages
760 - 761
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033387829
ISSN
1469-1825
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ddeca656-295f-49fc-85a5-c3475f93b51b (old id 810175)
date added to LUP
2008-01-28 08:35:50
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:55:43
@article{ddeca656-295f-49fc-85a5-c3475f93b51b,
  abstract     = {A subject may be in a state with nonconceptual content without having the concepts that describe the state. Nonconceptual content does not seem to be a clear-cut case of either implicit or explicit knowledge. It underlies a kind of practical knowledge that is not reducible to procedural knowledge, and is accessible to the subject and under voluntary control.},
  author       = {Brinck, Ingar},
  issn         = {1469-1825},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {760--761},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  title        = {Nonconceptual content and the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {1999},
}