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Flocked nasal swab versus nasopharyngeal aspirate in adult emergency room patients: similar multiplex PCR respiratory pathogen results and patient discomfort.

Hansen, Karin LU ; Westin, Johan; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Lindh, Magnus; Widell, Anders LU and Nilsson, Anna LU (2016) In Infectious Diseases 48(3). p.246-250
Abstract
Fifty adult emergency room patients with symptoms of respiratory tract infections or acute onset of extreme fatigue were sampled by both nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and flocked nasal swab (fNS). Respiratory agents were detected by a qualitative influenza PCR and an 18-valent multiplex PCR in 20 of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory tract infection, and in 3 of 21 without such a diagnosis. PCR detected influenza A and B in NPA samples from 11 patients and in fNS samples from 10 patients. Little or no discomfort was perceived by 60% of the patients when sampled by NPA and by 66% when sampled by fNS. We conclude that NPA and fNS were equally sensitive for detection of respiratory agents by multiplex PCR, and the two... (More)
Fifty adult emergency room patients with symptoms of respiratory tract infections or acute onset of extreme fatigue were sampled by both nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and flocked nasal swab (fNS). Respiratory agents were detected by a qualitative influenza PCR and an 18-valent multiplex PCR in 20 of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory tract infection, and in 3 of 21 without such a diagnosis. PCR detected influenza A and B in NPA samples from 11 patients and in fNS samples from 10 patients. Little or no discomfort was perceived by 60% of the patients when sampled by NPA and by 66% when sampled by fNS. We conclude that NPA and fNS were equally sensitive for detection of respiratory agents by multiplex PCR, and the two sampling methods did not differ significantly regarding discomfort perceived by patients (p = 0.171, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Hence less invasive sampling by fNS might be preferable in certain settings and situations. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Infectious Diseases
volume
48
issue
3
pages
246 - 250
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:26466764
  • wos:000367004500012
  • scopus:84962224661
ISSN
2374-4243
DOI
10.3109/23744235.2015.1096956
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c89f2a50-5c91-4285-82ce-531b5b37fc4e (old id 8152347)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26466764?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2015-11-03 13:27:55
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:03:50
@article{c89f2a50-5c91-4285-82ce-531b5b37fc4e,
  abstract     = {Fifty adult emergency room patients with symptoms of respiratory tract infections or acute onset of extreme fatigue were sampled by both nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and flocked nasal swab (fNS). Respiratory agents were detected by a qualitative influenza PCR and an 18-valent multiplex PCR in 20 of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory tract infection, and in 3 of 21 without such a diagnosis. PCR detected influenza A and B in NPA samples from 11 patients and in fNS samples from 10 patients. Little or no discomfort was perceived by 60% of the patients when sampled by NPA and by 66% when sampled by fNS. We conclude that NPA and fNS were equally sensitive for detection of respiratory agents by multiplex PCR, and the two sampling methods did not differ significantly regarding discomfort perceived by patients (p = 0.171, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Hence less invasive sampling by fNS might be preferable in certain settings and situations.},
  author       = {Hansen, Karin and Westin, Johan and Andersson, Lars-Magnus and Lindh, Magnus and Widell, Anders and Nilsson, Anna},
  issn         = {2374-4243},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {246--250},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Flocked nasal swab versus nasopharyngeal aspirate in adult emergency room patients: similar multiplex PCR respiratory pathogen results and patient discomfort.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/23744235.2015.1096956},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2016},
}