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The Colonisation History of the Scandinavian Fauna Presented through Subfossil Finds along One of Its Major Immigration Routes; Scania, Southern Sweden

Rosengren, Erika LU (2015) In Environment and ecology research 3(6). p.143-149
Abstract
Most of the Swedish subfossil finds of terrestrial mammals have been recovered from Scania. The contributing factors may be that the locally more abundant Late Weichselian sediment basins have been exposed through the extensive practice of peat cutting during the 19th century, and that the public awareness of the significance of the bones and antlers found, prior to the birth of the modern archaeological science, led to them being acquired to research collections. They came to form the basis for the discovery and reconstruction of the postglacial re-colonisation history of the terrestrial fauna. Here, some of these spectacular finds of faunal remains are presented. Today we know that Scania, through the recurrent establishment of a land... (More)
Most of the Swedish subfossil finds of terrestrial mammals have been recovered from Scania. The contributing factors may be that the locally more abundant Late Weichselian sediment basins have been exposed through the extensive practice of peat cutting during the 19th century, and that the public awareness of the significance of the bones and antlers found, prior to the birth of the modern archaeological science, led to them being acquired to research collections. They came to form the basis for the discovery and reconstruction of the postglacial re-colonisation history of the terrestrial fauna. Here, some of these spectacular finds of faunal remains are presented. Today we know that Scania, through the recurrent establishment of a land bridge connecting it to the European mainland, represented one of the major immigration routes into Scandinavia. Already in the Late Glacial the inhabitants of the disintegrating mammoth steppe colonised the newly deglaciated land. It was, however, mainly between c. 12,400 and 9500 cal. years BP, in part due to the existence of a more long lasting land bridge and the continuing amelioration of the climate, that the postglacial fauna in Sweden was formed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Subfossil, Scania, Sweden, History of Science, Research collections, Re-colonisation, Postglacial, Faunal history
in
Environment and ecology research
volume
3
issue
6
pages
143 - 149
publisher
Horizon Research Publishing Corporation
ISSN
2331-6268
DOI
10.13189/eer.2015.030601
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89482a2c-87b8-46dd-b7f9-943d09747183 (old id 8160665)
alternative location
http://www.hrpub.org/journals/article_info.php?aid=2992
date added to LUP
2015-11-11 12:34:03
date last changed
2016-04-16 01:16:44
@article{89482a2c-87b8-46dd-b7f9-943d09747183,
  abstract     = {Most of the Swedish subfossil finds of terrestrial mammals have been recovered from Scania. The contributing factors may be that the locally more abundant Late Weichselian sediment basins have been exposed through the extensive practice of peat cutting during the 19th century, and that the public awareness of the significance of the bones and antlers found, prior to the birth of the modern archaeological science, led to them being acquired to research collections. They came to form the basis for the discovery and reconstruction of the postglacial re-colonisation history of the terrestrial fauna. Here, some of these spectacular finds of faunal remains are presented. Today we know that Scania, through the recurrent establishment of a land bridge connecting it to the European mainland, represented one of the major immigration routes into Scandinavia. Already in the Late Glacial the inhabitants of the disintegrating mammoth steppe colonised the newly deglaciated land. It was, however, mainly between c. 12,400 and 9500 cal. years BP, in part due to the existence of a more long lasting land bridge and the continuing amelioration of the climate, that the postglacial fauna in Sweden was formed.},
  author       = {Rosengren, Erika},
  issn         = {2331-6268},
  keyword      = {Subfossil,Scania,Sweden,History of Science,Research collections,Re-colonisation,Postglacial,Faunal history},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {143--149},
  publisher    = {Horizon Research Publishing Corporation},
  series       = {Environment and ecology research},
  title        = {The Colonisation History of the Scandinavian Fauna Presented through Subfossil Finds along One of Its Major Immigration Routes; Scania, Southern Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13189/eer.2015.030601},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2015},
}