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Modelling the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds to new particle formation in the Julich plant atmosphere chamber

Roldin, Pontus LU ; Liao, L.; Mogensen, D.; Dal Maso, M.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E. and Kiendler-Scharr, A., et al. (2015) In Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 15(18). p.10777-10798
Abstract
We used the Aerosol Dynamics gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) to simulate the contribution of BVOC plant emissions to the observed new particle formation during photooxidation experiments performed in the Julich Plant-Atmosphere Chamber and to evaluate how well smog chamber experiments can mimic the atmospheric conditions during new particle formation events. ADCHAM couples the detailed gas-phase chemistry from Master Chemical Mechanism with a novel aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module. Our model simulations reveal that the observed particle growth may have either been controlled by the formation rate of semi- and low-volatility organic compounds in the gas phase or by acid... (More)
We used the Aerosol Dynamics gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) to simulate the contribution of BVOC plant emissions to the observed new particle formation during photooxidation experiments performed in the Julich Plant-Atmosphere Chamber and to evaluate how well smog chamber experiments can mimic the atmospheric conditions during new particle formation events. ADCHAM couples the detailed gas-phase chemistry from Master Chemical Mechanism with a novel aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module. Our model simulations reveal that the observed particle growth may have either been controlled by the formation rate of semi- and low-volatility organic compounds in the gas phase or by acid catalysed heterogeneous reactions between semi-volatility organic compounds in the particle surface layer (e.g. peroxyhemiacetal dimer formation). The contribution of extremely low-volatility organic gas-phase compounds to the particle formation and growth was suppressed because of their rapid and irreversible wall losses, which decreased their contribution to the nano-CN formation and growth compared to the atmospheric situation. The best agreement between the modelled and measured total particle number concentration (R-2 > 0.95) was achieved if the nano-CN was formed by kinetic nucleation involving both sulphuric acid and organic compounds formed from OH oxidation of BVOCs. (Less)
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
volume
15
issue
18
pages
10777 - 10798
publisher
Copernicus Gesellschaft Mbh
external identifiers
  • wos:000362457400028
  • scopus:84942636611
ISSN
1680-7324
DOI
10.5194/acp-15-10777-2015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1a09432e-4057-4c70-9a6f-ecfe8f74e886 (old id 8220571)
date added to LUP
2015-11-30 08:05:46
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:21:29
@article{1a09432e-4057-4c70-9a6f-ecfe8f74e886,
  abstract     = {We used the Aerosol Dynamics gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM) to simulate the contribution of BVOC plant emissions to the observed new particle formation during photooxidation experiments performed in the Julich Plant-Atmosphere Chamber and to evaluate how well smog chamber experiments can mimic the atmospheric conditions during new particle formation events. ADCHAM couples the detailed gas-phase chemistry from Master Chemical Mechanism with a novel aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module. Our model simulations reveal that the observed particle growth may have either been controlled by the formation rate of semi- and low-volatility organic compounds in the gas phase or by acid catalysed heterogeneous reactions between semi-volatility organic compounds in the particle surface layer (e.g. peroxyhemiacetal dimer formation). The contribution of extremely low-volatility organic gas-phase compounds to the particle formation and growth was suppressed because of their rapid and irreversible wall losses, which decreased their contribution to the nano-CN formation and growth compared to the atmospheric situation. The best agreement between the modelled and measured total particle number concentration (R-2 > 0.95) was achieved if the nano-CN was formed by kinetic nucleation involving both sulphuric acid and organic compounds formed from OH oxidation of BVOCs.},
  author       = {Roldin, Pontus and Liao, L. and Mogensen, D. and Dal Maso, M. and Rusanen, A. and Kerminen, V. -M. and Mentel, T. F. and Wildt, J. and Kleist, E. and Kiendler-Scharr, A. and Tillmann, R. and Ehn, M. and Kulmala, M. and Boy, M.},
  issn         = {1680-7324},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {18},
  pages        = {10777--10798},
  publisher    = {Copernicus Gesellschaft Mbh},
  series       = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics},
  title        = {Modelling the contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds to new particle formation in the Julich plant atmosphere chamber},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-10777-2015},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2015},
}