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Caesarean section per se does not increase the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes: a Swedish population-based study

Samuelsson, Ulf; Lindell, Nina; Bladh, Marie; Akesson, Karin; Carlsson, Annelie LU and Josefsson, Ann (2015) In Diabetologia 58(11). p.2517-2524
Abstract
Aims/hypothesis Some studies have revealed a relationship between Caesarean section (CS) and type 1 diabetes, while other studies have not. By using the Swedish paediatric quality register we investigated whether birth by CS is related to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes during childhood. Methods All children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes from 2000 to 2012 and included in the register (n= 9,376) were matched with four controls by year, day of birth, sex and county of birth from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results Overall, 13.5% of deliveries were by CS. By group, 14.7% of children who developed type 1 diabetes were delivered by CS compared with 13.3% of control children (p < 0.001). Mothers with diabetes more often gave... (More)
Aims/hypothesis Some studies have revealed a relationship between Caesarean section (CS) and type 1 diabetes, while other studies have not. By using the Swedish paediatric quality register we investigated whether birth by CS is related to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes during childhood. Methods All children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes from 2000 to 2012 and included in the register (n= 9,376) were matched with four controls by year, day of birth, sex and county of birth from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results Overall, 13.5% of deliveries were by CS. By group, 14.7% of children who developed type 1 diabetes were delivered by CS compared with 13.3% of control children (p < 0.001). Mothers with diabetes more often gave birth by CS than mothers without diabetes (78.8% vs 12.7%, p < 0.001). In a logistic regression model adjusting for maternal age, maternal diabetes and BMI in early pregnancy, the OR for CS was 1.0. A child who developed type 1 diabetes and had a mother with type 1 diabetes at the time of delivery had the highest OR to have been born by CS. Children of mothers without diabetes, delivered by CS, had no increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Maternal diabetes was the strongest predictor of childhood diabetes (OR 3.4), especially if the mother had type 1 diabetes (OR 7.54). Conclusions/interpretation CS had no influence on the risk of type 1 diabetes during childhood or adolescence. However, maternal diabetes itself strongly increased the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Caesarean section, Epidemiology, Pregnancy, Sex, Type 1 diabetes
in
Diabetologia
volume
58
issue
11
pages
2517 - 2524
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • wos:000361993000008
  • scopus:84942982134
ISSN
1432-0428
DOI
10.1007/s00125-015-3716-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cc45252c-acb4-4702-a575-29c2c1093455 (old id 8220858)
date added to LUP
2015-12-01 07:05:50
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:39:18
@article{cc45252c-acb4-4702-a575-29c2c1093455,
  abstract     = {Aims/hypothesis Some studies have revealed a relationship between Caesarean section (CS) and type 1 diabetes, while other studies have not. By using the Swedish paediatric quality register we investigated whether birth by CS is related to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes during childhood. Methods All children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes from 2000 to 2012 and included in the register (n= 9,376) were matched with four controls by year, day of birth, sex and county of birth from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Results Overall, 13.5% of deliveries were by CS. By group, 14.7% of children who developed type 1 diabetes were delivered by CS compared with 13.3% of control children (p &lt; 0.001). Mothers with diabetes more often gave birth by CS than mothers without diabetes (78.8% vs 12.7%, p &lt; 0.001). In a logistic regression model adjusting for maternal age, maternal diabetes and BMI in early pregnancy, the OR for CS was 1.0. A child who developed type 1 diabetes and had a mother with type 1 diabetes at the time of delivery had the highest OR to have been born by CS. Children of mothers without diabetes, delivered by CS, had no increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Maternal diabetes was the strongest predictor of childhood diabetes (OR 3.4), especially if the mother had type 1 diabetes (OR 7.54). Conclusions/interpretation CS had no influence on the risk of type 1 diabetes during childhood or adolescence. However, maternal diabetes itself strongly increased the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes.},
  author       = {Samuelsson, Ulf and Lindell, Nina and Bladh, Marie and Akesson, Karin and Carlsson, Annelie and Josefsson, Ann},
  issn         = {1432-0428},
  keyword      = {Caesarean section,Epidemiology,Pregnancy,Sex,Type 1 diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2517--2524},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {Diabetologia},
  title        = {Caesarean section per se does not increase the risk of offspring developing type 1 diabetes: a Swedish population-based study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-015-3716-3},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2015},
}