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‘Men just drink more than women. Women have friends to talk to’—Gendered understandings of depression among healthcare professionals and their implications

Oute, Jeppe; Tondora, Janis and Glasdam, Stinne LU (2018) In Nursing Inquiry p.12241-12241
Abstract (Swedish)
Little is known about how gendered understandings of patients can inform professionals’ discretionary actions and decisions to include or exclude in clinical practice. Using Connell's poststructuralist perspectives on gender as an analytic framework, this article aims to investigate how professionals’ articulations of depression are framed by signs of masculinity and femininity, and how these articulations inform service provision to patients with depression in clinical psychiatry. Building on interview data drawn from an ethnographic study, the article shows how the professionals’ articulations reflected a gender binary that framed how the feminized patients were often connected to psychiatric care while masculinized patients were... (More)
Little is known about how gendered understandings of patients can inform professionals’ discretionary actions and decisions to include or exclude in clinical practice. Using Connell's poststructuralist perspectives on gender as an analytic framework, this article aims to investigate how professionals’ articulations of depression are framed by signs of masculinity and femininity, and how these articulations inform service provision to patients with depression in clinical psychiatry. Building on interview data drawn from an ethnographic study, the article shows how the professionals’ articulations reflected a gender binary that framed how the feminized patients were often connected to psychiatric care while masculinized patients were referred to separate alcohol or substance use treatment outside the psychiatric institution. The article discusses the societal and institutional conditionality of gendered understandings in psychiatry. In spite of several limitations, the article elucidates how professionals’ understandings might have wide‐ranging implications for the accuracy of epidemiological research and policy, and how they reflect a power struggle between patients and professionals about the legitimate right to interpret patients’ conditions and efforts to manage their illness‐related problems. (Less)
Abstract
Little is known about how gendered understandings of patients can inform professionals’ discretionary actions and decisions to include or exclude in clinical practice. Using Connell's poststructuralist perspectives on gender as an analytic framework, this article aims to investigate how professionals’ articulations of depression are framed by signs of masculinity and femininity, and how these articulations inform service provision to patients with depression in clinical psychiatry. Building on interview data drawn from an ethnographic study, the article shows how the professionals’ articulations reflected a gender binary that framed how the feminized patients were often connected to psychiatric care while masculinized patients were... (More)
Little is known about how gendered understandings of patients can inform professionals’ discretionary actions and decisions to include or exclude in clinical practice. Using Connell's poststructuralist perspectives on gender as an analytic framework, this article aims to investigate how professionals’ articulations of depression are framed by signs of masculinity and femininity, and how these articulations inform service provision to patients with depression in clinical psychiatry. Building on interview data drawn from an ethnographic study, the article shows how the professionals’ articulations reflected a gender binary that framed how the feminized patients were often connected to psychiatric care while masculinized patients were referred to separate alcohol or substance use treatment outside the psychiatric institution. The article discusses the societal and institutional conditionality of gendered understandings in psychiatry. In spite of several limitations, the article elucidates how professionals’ understandings might have wide‐ranging implications for the accuracy of epidemiological research and policy, and how they reflect a power struggle between patients and professionals about the legitimate right to interpret patients’ conditions and efforts to manage their illness‐related problems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nursing Inquiry
pages
12241 - 12241
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85045195259
ISSN
1440-1800
DOI
10.1111/nin.12241
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
82ccc53a-e510-41d2-a04c-7a7903e24221
date added to LUP
2018-04-11 12:32:26
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:30:55
@article{82ccc53a-e510-41d2-a04c-7a7903e24221,
  abstract     = {Little is known about how gendered understandings of patients can inform professionals’ discretionary actions and decisions to include or exclude in clinical practice. Using Connell's poststructuralist perspectives on gender as an analytic framework, this article aims to investigate how professionals’ articulations of depression are framed by signs of masculinity and femininity, and how these articulations inform service provision to patients with depression in clinical psychiatry. Building on interview data drawn from an ethnographic study, the article shows how the professionals’ articulations reflected a gender binary that framed how the feminized patients were often connected to psychiatric care while masculinized patients were referred to separate alcohol or substance use treatment outside the psychiatric institution. The article discusses the societal and institutional conditionality of gendered understandings in psychiatry. In spite of several limitations, the article elucidates how professionals’ understandings might have wide‐ranging implications for the accuracy of epidemiological research and policy, and how they reflect a power struggle between patients and professionals about the legitimate right to interpret patients’ conditions and efforts to manage their illness‐related problems. },
  author       = {Oute, Jeppe and Tondora, Janis and Glasdam, Stinne},
  issn         = {1440-1800},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  pages        = {12241--12241},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Nursing Inquiry},
  title        = {‘Men just drink more than women. Women have friends to talk to’—Gendered understandings of depression among healthcare professionals and their implications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nin.12241},
  year         = {2018},
}