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Liposuction of arm lymphoedema.

Brorson, Håkan LU (2003) In Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, Plastische Chirurgie 35(4). p.225-232
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common disease in women, and up to 38% develop lymphedema of the arm following mastectomy, standard axillary node dissection and postoperative irradiation. Limb reductions have been reported utilising various conservative therapies such as manual lymph and pressure therapy. Some patients with long-standing pronounced lymphedema do not respond to these conservative treatments because slow or absent lymph flow causes the formation of excess subcutaneous adipose tissue.

Previous surgical regimes utilising bridging procedures, total excision with skin grafting or reduction plasty seldom achieved acceptable cosmetic and functional results. Microsurgical reconstruction involving lympho-venous shunts or... (More)
Breast cancer is the most common disease in women, and up to 38% develop lymphedema of the arm following mastectomy, standard axillary node dissection and postoperative irradiation. Limb reductions have been reported utilising various conservative therapies such as manual lymph and pressure therapy. Some patients with long-standing pronounced lymphedema do not respond to these conservative treatments because slow or absent lymph flow causes the formation of excess subcutaneous adipose tissue.

Previous surgical regimes utilising bridging procedures, total excision with skin grafting or reduction plasty seldom achieved acceptable cosmetic and functional results. Microsurgical reconstruction involving lympho-venous shunts or transplantation of lymph vessels has also been investigated. Although attractive in concept, the common failure of microsurgery to provide complete reduction is due to the persistence of newly formed subcutaneous adipose tissue which is not removed in patients with chronic non-pitting lymphedema.

Liposuction removes the hypertrophied adipose tissue and is a prerequisite to achieve complete reduction. The new equilibrium is maintained through constant (24-hour) use of compression garments postoperatively. Long term follow up (7 years) does not show any recurrence of the edema. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
arm lymphedema, lymphedema, breast cancer, compression therapy, liposuction, lymph therapy
in
Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, Plastische Chirurgie
volume
35
issue
4
pages
225 - 232
publisher
Hippokrates Verlag
external identifiers
  • pmid:12968220
  • scopus:0042336996
ISSN
0722-1819
DOI
10.1055/s-2003-42128
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
272c4506-22e1-4948-8db0-a06d31817e70 (old id 839040)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12968220
date added to LUP
2015-02-28 09:06:13
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:54:04
@article{272c4506-22e1-4948-8db0-a06d31817e70,
  abstract     = {Breast cancer is the most common disease in women, and up to 38% develop lymphedema of the arm following mastectomy, standard axillary node dissection and postoperative irradiation. Limb reductions have been reported utilising various conservative therapies such as manual lymph and pressure therapy. Some patients with long-standing pronounced lymphedema do not respond to these conservative treatments because slow or absent lymph flow causes the formation of excess subcutaneous adipose tissue. <br/><br>
Previous surgical regimes utilising bridging procedures, total excision with skin grafting or reduction plasty seldom achieved acceptable cosmetic and functional results. Microsurgical reconstruction involving lympho-venous shunts or transplantation of lymph vessels has also been investigated. Although attractive in concept, the common failure of microsurgery to provide complete reduction is due to the persistence of newly formed subcutaneous adipose tissue which is not removed in patients with chronic non-pitting lymphedema.<br/><br>
Liposuction removes the hypertrophied adipose tissue and is a prerequisite to achieve complete reduction. The new equilibrium is maintained through constant (24-hour) use of compression garments postoperatively. Long term follow up (7 years) does not show any recurrence of the edema.},
  author       = {Brorson, Håkan},
  issn         = {0722-1819},
  keyword      = {arm lymphedema,lymphedema,breast cancer,compression therapy,liposuction,lymph therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {225--232},
  publisher    = {Hippokrates Verlag},
  series       = {Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, Plastische Chirurgie},
  title        = {Liposuction of arm lymphoedema.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2003-42128},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2003},
}