Advanced

Self-Reported Discrimination in Health-Care Settings Based on Recognizability as Transgender : A Cross-Sectional Study Among Transgender U.S. Citizens

Rodriguez, Amanda; Agardh, Anette LU and Asamoah, Benedict Oppong LU (2017) In Archives of Sexual Behavior p.1-13
Abstract

Discrimination has long been tied to health inequality. Rejected by families and communities because of their gender identity and gender-role behavior, transgender individuals are often socially marginalized. This study aimed to assess discrimination in health-care settings among persons self-identifying as transgender in the U.S. in relation to their recognizability as transgender, operationalized as how often they experienced that others recognized them as transgender. Data were obtained from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (n = 6106 participants, assigned sex at birth = 3608 males, 2480 females, respectively). Binary logistic regressions were performed to examine associations between transgender recognizability and... (More)

Discrimination has long been tied to health inequality. Rejected by families and communities because of their gender identity and gender-role behavior, transgender individuals are often socially marginalized. This study aimed to assess discrimination in health-care settings among persons self-identifying as transgender in the U.S. in relation to their recognizability as transgender, operationalized as how often they experienced that others recognized them as transgender. Data were obtained from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (n = 6106 participants, assigned sex at birth = 3608 males, 2480 females, respectively). Binary logistic regressions were performed to examine associations between transgender recognizability and discrimination in health-care settings. Being recognized as transgender to any extent had a significant effect on perceived discrimination in health care. Always recognized as transgender showed significant associations with discrimination in a health-care setting (OR 1.48) and the following individualized health-care settings: social service settings (rape crisis and domestic violence centers, OR 5.22) and mental health settings (mental health clinic and drug treatment program, OR 1.87). Sex work and other street economy, which are known experiential factors affected by discrimination, were also significantly associated with discrimination in health-care settings. Discrimination in health-care settings is pervasive for transgender who are recognized as transgender. Public health efforts to improve access to equitable health care for transgender individuals may benefit from consideration of demographic, experiential, and medical risk factors to more fully understand the source of the seemingly excess risk of discrimination among persons recognized by others as being transgender.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Discrimination, Health care, HIV, Sex worker, Transgender
in
Archives of Sexual Behavior
pages
13 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026913638
ISSN
0004-0002
DOI
10.1007/s10508-017-1028-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8453a7ad-d871-422b-8c33-e3977c8d8475
date added to LUP
2017-08-29 13:59:35
date last changed
2017-08-30 03:00:02
@article{8453a7ad-d871-422b-8c33-e3977c8d8475,
  abstract     = {<p>Discrimination has long been tied to health inequality. Rejected by families and communities because of their gender identity and gender-role behavior, transgender individuals are often socially marginalized. This study aimed to assess discrimination in health-care settings among persons self-identifying as transgender in the U.S. in relation to their recognizability as transgender, operationalized as how often they experienced that others recognized them as transgender. Data were obtained from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (n = 6106 participants, assigned sex at birth = 3608 males, 2480 females, respectively). Binary logistic regressions were performed to examine associations between transgender recognizability and discrimination in health-care settings. Being recognized as transgender to any extent had a significant effect on perceived discrimination in health care. Always recognized as transgender showed significant associations with discrimination in a health-care setting (OR 1.48) and the following individualized health-care settings: social service settings (rape crisis and domestic violence centers, OR 5.22) and mental health settings (mental health clinic and drug treatment program, OR 1.87). Sex work and other street economy, which are known experiential factors affected by discrimination, were also significantly associated with discrimination in health-care settings. Discrimination in health-care settings is pervasive for transgender who are recognized as transgender. Public health efforts to improve access to equitable health care for transgender individuals may benefit from consideration of demographic, experiential, and medical risk factors to more fully understand the source of the seemingly excess risk of discrimination among persons recognized by others as being transgender.</p>},
  author       = {Rodriguez, Amanda and Agardh, Anette and Asamoah, Benedict Oppong},
  issn         = {0004-0002},
  keyword      = {Discrimination,Health care,HIV,Sex worker,Transgender},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {1--13},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Archives of Sexual Behavior},
  title        = {Self-Reported Discrimination in Health-Care Settings Based on Recognizability as Transgender : A Cross-Sectional Study Among Transgender U.S. Citizens},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10508-017-1028-z},
  year         = {2017},
}