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Nitric oxide-producing cells project from retinal grafts to the inner plexiform layer of the host retina

Zhang, Yiqin LU ; Sharma, R K LU ; Ehinger, B LU and Perez, M T LU (1999) In Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science 40(12). p.3062-3066
Abstract

PURPOSE: Amacrine cells expressing nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are seen in normal retinas and retinal grafts to extend long processes, which can be followed for long distances. Taking advantage of the morphologic features of these cells, the present study examined whether graft-host connections involve cells capable of producing nitric oxide, a recognized retinal neuromodulatory compound.

METHODS: Embryonic day 15 rabbit retinas were transplanted to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The localization of the neuronal form of NOS was assessed by immunocytochemistry in grafts that had reached the equivalent ages of postnatal days 5, 12, 20, 45, 90, and 102.

RESULTS: NOS-containing cells and processes were seen in all the... (More)

PURPOSE: Amacrine cells expressing nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are seen in normal retinas and retinal grafts to extend long processes, which can be followed for long distances. Taking advantage of the morphologic features of these cells, the present study examined whether graft-host connections involve cells capable of producing nitric oxide, a recognized retinal neuromodulatory compound.

METHODS: Embryonic day 15 rabbit retinas were transplanted to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The localization of the neuronal form of NOS was assessed by immunocytochemistry in grafts that had reached the equivalent ages of postnatal days 5, 12, 20, 45, 90, and 102.

RESULTS: NOS-containing cells and processes were seen in all the transplants. Processes were found to project mainly toward areas within the graft. Yet, at all survival times examined, single immunolabeled fibers could be seen to cross the graft- host border. In fortuitous cases, it was possible to establish that the bridging fiber originated in the graft. Further, bridging fibers were seen to reach the NOS-immunolabeled host inner plexiform layer.

CONCLUSIONS: Graft NOS-containing cells are not only capable of projecting into the host but also of reaching the appropriate target for NOS-containing fibers within the host retina. This indicates that at least some graft-host connections are established by graft cells that retain their ability to synthesize a modulatory compound and which potentially could contact their partner cells in the host retina.

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keywords
Animals, Cell Survival, Cell Transplantation, Extracellular Space, Fetal Tissue Transplantation, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect, Graft Survival, Neurons, Afferent, Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I, Presynaptic Terminals, Rabbits, Retina, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science
volume
40
issue
12
pages
5 pages
publisher
The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032710777
ISSN
1552-5783
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8c1b1684-7c4f-4618-bfb6-54f37b1a49e3 (old id 8522265)
alternative location
http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2199822
date added to LUP
2016-01-25 10:02:37
date last changed
2017-01-03 07:32:12
@article{8c1b1684-7c4f-4618-bfb6-54f37b1a49e3,
  abstract     = {<p>PURPOSE: Amacrine cells expressing nitric oxide synthase (NOS) are seen in normal retinas and retinal grafts to extend long processes, which can be followed for long distances. Taking advantage of the morphologic features of these cells, the present study examined whether graft-host connections involve cells capable of producing nitric oxide, a recognized retinal neuromodulatory compound.</p><p>METHODS: Embryonic day 15 rabbit retinas were transplanted to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The localization of the neuronal form of NOS was assessed by immunocytochemistry in grafts that had reached the equivalent ages of postnatal days 5, 12, 20, 45, 90, and 102.</p><p>RESULTS: NOS-containing cells and processes were seen in all the transplants. Processes were found to project mainly toward areas within the graft. Yet, at all survival times examined, single immunolabeled fibers could be seen to cross the graft- host border. In fortuitous cases, it was possible to establish that the bridging fiber originated in the graft. Further, bridging fibers were seen to reach the NOS-immunolabeled host inner plexiform layer.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Graft NOS-containing cells are not only capable of projecting into the host but also of reaching the appropriate target for NOS-containing fibers within the host retina. This indicates that at least some graft-host connections are established by graft cells that retain their ability to synthesize a modulatory compound and which potentially could contact their partner cells in the host retina.</p>},
  author       = {Zhang, Yiqin and Sharma, R K and Ehinger, B and Perez, M T},
  issn         = {1552-5783},
  keyword      = {Animals,Cell Survival,Cell Transplantation,Extracellular Space,Fetal Tissue Transplantation,Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect,Graft Survival,Neurons, Afferent,Nitric Oxide,Nitric Oxide Synthase,Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I,Presynaptic Terminals,Rabbits,Retina,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {3062--3066},
  publisher    = {The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.},
  series       = {Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science},
  title        = {Nitric oxide-producing cells project from retinal grafts to the inner plexiform layer of the host retina},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {1999},
}