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Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.

Emilsson, Össur Ingi; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Cook, Elizabeth; Júlíusson, Sigurður; Berg, Sören LU ; Nordang, Leif; Björnsson, Einar Stefán; Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna and Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía, et al. (2016) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 51(5). p.524-530
Abstract
Objective Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. Material and methods A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n = 48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n = 42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were... (More)
Objective Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. Material and methods A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n = 48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n = 42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Results Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p = 0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p = 0.04). Conclusions Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population. (Less)
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Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
51
issue
5
pages
524 - 530
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:26825677
  • scopus:84956626063
  • wos:000369846300002
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.3109/00365521.2015.1124284
language
English
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yes
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ad81c4e5-17aa-441f-be20-16ddb2d70fd7 (old id 8572880)
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26825677?dopt=Abstract
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2016-02-04 21:47:24
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2017-01-01 07:43:06
@article{ad81c4e5-17aa-441f-be20-16ddb2d70fd7,
  abstract     = {Objective Nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) has been associated with respiratory diseases. Our aim was to study a questionnaire method to identify nGER subjects with respiratory involvement in a general population. Material and methods A subgroup of Icelandic participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III (ECRHS III) reporting symptoms of nGER (n = 48) as well as age and gender paired controls (n = 42) were studied further by a structured interview, questionnaires, laryngeal fibrescopy, and exhaled breath condensate. A subgroup underwent 24-h oesophageal pH impedance (24-h MII-pH) measurements. Symptoms of nGER were assessed with a modified version of the reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), where symptoms were divided into daytime and nocturnal. A report of nGER both at baseline and at follow-up was defined as persistent nGER. Results Participants reporting persistent nGER had significantly more signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux according to the reflux finding score than those without nGER (Mean ± SD: 5.1 ± 2.3 vs. 3.9 ± 2.2, p = 0.02). Of the 16 persistent nGER subjects that underwent 24-h MII-pH, 11 had abnormal gastroesophageal reflux, but none of three control subjects (69% vs. 0%). Pepsin was more commonly found in exhaled breath condensate in the nGER group (67% vs. 45%, p = 0.04). Conclusions Participants with nGER symptoms at least once a month, reported on two occasions, had a high level of positive 24-h MII-pH measurements, laryngeal inflammation and pepsin in exhaled breath condensate. This nGER definition identified a representable group for studies on nGER and respiratory diseases in a general population.},
  author       = {Emilsson, Össur Ingi and Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís and Ólafsson, Ísleifur and Cook, Elizabeth and Júlíusson, Sigurður and Berg, Sören and Nordang, Leif and Björnsson, Einar Stefán and Guðlaugsdóttir, Sunna and Guðmundsdóttir, Anna Soffía and Janson, Christer and Gislason, Thorarinn},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {524--530},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Definition of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux for studies on respiratory diseases.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365521.2015.1124284},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2016},
}