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Bacterial and fungal colonization and decomposition of submerged plant litter: consequences for biogenic silica dissolution.

Alfredsson, Hanna LU ; Clymans, Wim LU ; Stadmark, Johanna LU ; Conley, Daniel LU and Rousk, Johannes LU (2016) In FEMS Microbiology Ecology 92(3).
Abstract
We studied bacterial and fungal colonization of submerged plant litter, using a known Si-accumulator (Equisetum arvense), in experimental microcosms during one month. We specifically addressed the microbial decomposer role concerning biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution from the degrading litter. To vary the rates and level of microbial colonization, the litter was combined with a range of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) supplements. Overall microbial growth on plant litter increased with higher levels of N and P. There was a tendency for higher bacterial than fungal stimulation with higher nutrient levels. Differences in microbial colonization of litter between treatments allowed us to test how Si remineralization from plants was... (More)
We studied bacterial and fungal colonization of submerged plant litter, using a known Si-accumulator (Equisetum arvense), in experimental microcosms during one month. We specifically addressed the microbial decomposer role concerning biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution from the degrading litter. To vary the rates and level of microbial colonization, the litter was combined with a range of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) supplements. Overall microbial growth on plant litter increased with higher levels of N and P. There was a tendency for higher bacterial than fungal stimulation with higher nutrient levels. Differences in microbial colonization of litter between treatments allowed us to test how Si remineralization from plants was influenced by microbial litter decomposition. Contrary to previous results and expectations, we observed a general reduction in Si release from plant litter colonized by a microbial community, compared with sterile control treatments. This suggested that microbial growth resulted in a reduction in dissolved Si concentrations, and we discuss candidate mechanisms to explain this outcome. Hence, our results imply that the microbial role in plant litter associated Si turnover is different from that commonly assumed based on bSiO2 dissolution studies in aquatic ecosystems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
FEMS Microbiology Ecology
volume
92
issue
3
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:26790464
  • wos:000373295800006
  • scopus:84962189661
ISSN
1574-6941
DOI
10.1093/femsec/fiw011
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b9f11ddb-5ec7-463d-9942-d0070ba0f43f (old id 8576823)
date added to LUP
2016-02-17 09:28:50
date last changed
2017-06-25 03:55:47
@article{b9f11ddb-5ec7-463d-9942-d0070ba0f43f,
  abstract     = {We studied bacterial and fungal colonization of submerged plant litter, using a known Si-accumulator (Equisetum arvense), in experimental microcosms during one month. We specifically addressed the microbial decomposer role concerning biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution from the degrading litter. To vary the rates and level of microbial colonization, the litter was combined with a range of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) supplements. Overall microbial growth on plant litter increased with higher levels of N and P. There was a tendency for higher bacterial than fungal stimulation with higher nutrient levels. Differences in microbial colonization of litter between treatments allowed us to test how Si remineralization from plants was influenced by microbial litter decomposition. Contrary to previous results and expectations, we observed a general reduction in Si release from plant litter colonized by a microbial community, compared with sterile control treatments. This suggested that microbial growth resulted in a reduction in dissolved Si concentrations, and we discuss candidate mechanisms to explain this outcome. Hence, our results imply that the microbial role in plant litter associated Si turnover is different from that commonly assumed based on bSiO2 dissolution studies in aquatic ecosystems.},
  author       = {Alfredsson, Hanna and Clymans, Wim and Stadmark, Johanna and Conley, Daniel and Rousk, Johannes},
  issn         = {1574-6941},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {3},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {FEMS Microbiology Ecology},
  title        = {Bacterial and fungal colonization and decomposition of submerged plant litter: consequences for biogenic silica dissolution.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiw011},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2016},
}