Advanced

Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin LU ; Lohmander, L. Stefan LU ; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe and Thorlund, Jonas B. (2017) In Acta Orthopaedica 88(1). p.90-95
Abstract

Background and purpose — Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients’ characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods — 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18–77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires... (More)

Background and purpose — Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients’ characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods — 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18–77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results — 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation — Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Orthopaedica
volume
88
issue
1
pages
90 - 95
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84994154362
  • wos:000392736200015
ISSN
1745-3674
DOI
10.1080/17453674.2016.1253329
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
87aefb02-f841-407b-a4ac-b56dbb0b775a
date added to LUP
2016-11-21 12:52:36
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:36:13
@article{87aefb02-f841-407b-a4ac-b56dbb0b775a,
  abstract     = {<p>Background and purpose — Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients’ characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods — 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18–77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results — 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation — Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.</p>},
  author       = {Pihl, Kenneth and Englund, Martin and Lohmander, L. Stefan and Jørgensen, Uffe and Nissen, Nis and Schjerning, Jeppe and Thorlund, Jonas B.},
  issn         = {1745-3674},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {90--95},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Orthopaedica},
  title        = {Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453674.2016.1253329},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2017},
}