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Migratory refueling affects non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, but does not increase lipid peroxidation.

Eikenaar, Cas; Bailey Jönsson, Johanna LU ; Fritzsch, Anna; Wang, Hong-Lei LU and Isaksson, Caroline LU (2016) In Physiology & Behavior 158. p.26-32
Abstract
All aerobic organisms are to some degree affected by oxidative stress, which is an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the former. Pro-oxidants can damage DNA, proteins and lipids, and as such oxidative stress can carry considerably fitness costs. In mammals excessive calorie intake is a known cause of oxidative stress. We investigated whether in migrant birds, which typically engage in over-eating in between flights (refueling), high food intake causes oxidative stress. In an experiment we compared levels of plasmatic total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (AOX) and oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) between migrants repeatedly fasted and refed (simulating the flight-refuel cycle of wild migrants), and... (More)
All aerobic organisms are to some degree affected by oxidative stress, which is an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the former. Pro-oxidants can damage DNA, proteins and lipids, and as such oxidative stress can carry considerably fitness costs. In mammals excessive calorie intake is a known cause of oxidative stress. We investigated whether in migrant birds, which typically engage in over-eating in between flights (refueling), high food intake causes oxidative stress. In an experiment we compared levels of plasmatic total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (AOX) and oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) between migrants repeatedly fasted and refed (simulating the flight-refuel cycle of wild migrants), and migrants on ad libitum food. We found that refueling increased AOX, an effect mainly attributable to an increase in uric acid level, an antioxidant that is produced during protein metabolism. Accordingly, variation in AOX was mainly explained by the refueling birds' food intake. However, food intake in migrants on ad libitum food did not explain any variation in AOX. Refueling did not affect lipid peroxidation, nor were its levels explained by food intake. We propose that over-eating migrants retain uric acid, which might be a very low cost mechanism to forego oxidative damage. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physiology & Behavior
volume
158
pages
26 - 32
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:26921098
  • scopus:84959378024
  • wos:000374607700004
ISSN
1873-507X
DOI
10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.02.033
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
10436e29-a2d2-4cb2-a2a1-4018170bb4a7 (old id 8821470)
date added to LUP
2016-03-16 16:11:08
date last changed
2017-11-05 04:08:10
@article{10436e29-a2d2-4cb2-a2a1-4018170bb4a7,
  abstract     = {All aerobic organisms are to some degree affected by oxidative stress, which is an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the former. Pro-oxidants can damage DNA, proteins and lipids, and as such oxidative stress can carry considerably fitness costs. In mammals excessive calorie intake is a known cause of oxidative stress. We investigated whether in migrant birds, which typically engage in over-eating in between flights (refueling), high food intake causes oxidative stress. In an experiment we compared levels of plasmatic total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity (AOX) and oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) between migrants repeatedly fasted and refed (simulating the flight-refuel cycle of wild migrants), and migrants on ad libitum food. We found that refueling increased AOX, an effect mainly attributable to an increase in uric acid level, an antioxidant that is produced during protein metabolism. Accordingly, variation in AOX was mainly explained by the refueling birds' food intake. However, food intake in migrants on ad libitum food did not explain any variation in AOX. Refueling did not affect lipid peroxidation, nor were its levels explained by food intake. We propose that over-eating migrants retain uric acid, which might be a very low cost mechanism to forego oxidative damage.},
  author       = {Eikenaar, Cas and Bailey Jönsson, Johanna and Fritzsch, Anna and Wang, Hong-Lei and Isaksson, Caroline},
  issn         = {1873-507X},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {26--32},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Physiology & Behavior},
  title        = {Migratory refueling affects non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, but does not increase lipid peroxidation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.02.033},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2016},
}