Advanced

Lower urinary tract symptoms in children with anorectal malformations with rectoperineal fistulas.

Stenström, Pernilla LU ; Sandelin, Hanna; Emblem, Ragnhild and Björnland, Kristin (2016) In Journal of Pediatric Surgery 51(8). p.1234-1240
Abstract
AIM:The aim was to describe the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in children with anorectal malformations with rectoperineal fistulas (ARM-P), as compared with healthy controls based on gender.METHOD:LUTS were defined using the 2014 definitions of the International Children's Continence Society. Data were collected at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery centers in 2 countries from all children aged 4-12years who had undergone an operation for ARM-P.RESULTS:A total of 24 girls and 33 boys, with a median age of 8 (4-12)years, were eligible and compared with 165 controls. Of the patient group, 4 (17%) girls had 8 urinary tract anomalies (UTA), and 8 (24%) boys had 13 UTA. There were no gender differences in LUTS among the patients.... (More)
AIM:The aim was to describe the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in children with anorectal malformations with rectoperineal fistulas (ARM-P), as compared with healthy controls based on gender.METHOD:LUTS were defined using the 2014 definitions of the International Children's Continence Society. Data were collected at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery centers in 2 countries from all children aged 4-12years who had undergone an operation for ARM-P.RESULTS:A total of 24 girls and 33 boys, with a median age of 8 (4-12)years, were eligible and compared with 165 controls. Of the patient group, 4 (17%) girls had 8 urinary tract anomalies (UTA), and 8 (24%) boys had 13 UTA. There were no gender differences in LUTS among the patients. The frequency of urinary tract infections was higher among the patients (5/24 girls and 7/55 boys) than the controls (1/55 and 4/110) (p=0.009). More patients (5/24 girls and 5/33 boys) than controls (1/55 and 2/110) used daily urinary medications (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). Patients with UTA reported urinary infections more frequently (3/4 girls and 4/8 boys) than those without UTA (2/20 girls and 0/25 boys) (p=0.018 and p=0.002, respectively).CONCLUSION:Children with ARM-P had more LUTS than controls, and patients with concomitant UTA had more LUTS than patients without UTA. Therefore, children with ARM-P are suggested to have routine follow-up for both UTA and LUTS. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Pediatric Surgery
volume
51
issue
8
pages
1234 - 1240
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:26902512
  • scopus:84958292198
  • wos:000382229600002
ISSN
1531-5037
DOI
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.01.015
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
68552952-d0ce-4f0d-bd8c-f21e58e3ce54 (old id 8821995)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26902512?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-03 11:28:48
date last changed
2017-01-24 08:14:10
@article{68552952-d0ce-4f0d-bd8c-f21e58e3ce54,
  abstract     = {AIM:The aim was to describe the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in children with anorectal malformations with rectoperineal fistulas (ARM-P), as compared with healthy controls based on gender.METHOD:LUTS were defined using the 2014 definitions of the International Children's Continence Society. Data were collected at 2 tertiary pediatric surgery centers in 2 countries from all children aged 4-12years who had undergone an operation for ARM-P.RESULTS:A total of 24 girls and 33 boys, with a median age of 8 (4-12)years, were eligible and compared with 165 controls. Of the patient group, 4 (17%) girls had 8 urinary tract anomalies (UTA), and 8 (24%) boys had 13 UTA. There were no gender differences in LUTS among the patients. The frequency of urinary tract infections was higher among the patients (5/24 girls and 7/55 boys) than the controls (1/55 and 4/110) (p=0.009). More patients (5/24 girls and 5/33 boys) than controls (1/55 and 2/110) used daily urinary medications (p=0.009 and p=0.007, respectively). Patients with UTA reported urinary infections more frequently (3/4 girls and 4/8 boys) than those without UTA (2/20 girls and 0/25 boys) (p=0.018 and p=0.002, respectively).CONCLUSION:Children with ARM-P had more LUTS than controls, and patients with concomitant UTA had more LUTS than patients without UTA. Therefore, children with ARM-P are suggested to have routine follow-up for both UTA and LUTS.},
  author       = {Stenström, Pernilla and Sandelin, Hanna and Emblem, Ragnhild and Björnland, Kristin},
  issn         = {1531-5037},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1234--1240},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Pediatric Surgery},
  title        = {Lower urinary tract symptoms in children with anorectal malformations with rectoperineal fistulas.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.01.015},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2016},
}