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Differential neutrophil responses to bacterial stimuli: Streptococcal strains are potent inducers of heparin-binding protein and resistin-release.

Snäll, Johanna; Linnér, Anna; Uhlmann, Julia LU ; Siemens, Nikolai; Ibold, Heike; Janos, Marton; Linder, Adam LU ; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko LU and Johansson, Linda, et al. (2016) In Scientific Reports 6.
Abstract
Neutrophils are critical for the control of bacterial infections, but they may also contribute to disease pathology. Here we explore neutrophil responses, in particular the release of sepsis-associated factors heparin-binding protein (HBP) and resistin in relation to specific bacterial stimuli and sepsis of varying aetiology. Analyses of HBP and resistin in plasma of septic patients revealed elevated levels as compared to non-infected critically ill patients. HBP and resistin correlated significantly in septic patients, with the strongest association seen in group A streptococcal (GAS) cases. In vitro stimulation of human neutrophils revealed that fixed streptococcal strains induced significantly higher release of HBP and resistin, as... (More)
Neutrophils are critical for the control of bacterial infections, but they may also contribute to disease pathology. Here we explore neutrophil responses, in particular the release of sepsis-associated factors heparin-binding protein (HBP) and resistin in relation to specific bacterial stimuli and sepsis of varying aetiology. Analyses of HBP and resistin in plasma of septic patients revealed elevated levels as compared to non-infected critically ill patients. HBP and resistin correlated significantly in septic patients, with the strongest association seen in group A streptococcal (GAS) cases. In vitro stimulation of human neutrophils revealed that fixed streptococcal strains induced significantly higher release of HBP and resistin, as compared to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. Similarly, neutrophils stimulated with the streptococcal M1-protein showed a significant increase in co-localization of HBP and resistin positive granules as well as exocytosis of these factors, as compared to LPS. Using a GAS strain deficient in M1-protein expression had negligible effect on neutrophil activation, while a strain deficient in the stand-alone regulator MsmR was significantly less stimulatory as compared to its wild type strain. Taken together, the findings suggest that the streptococcal activation of neutrophils is multifactorial and involves, but is not limited to, proteins encoded by the FCT-locus. (Less)
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Scientific Reports
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6
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
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  • pmid:26887258
  • scopus:84959019109
  • wos:000370370000001
ISSN
2045-2322
DOI
10.1038/srep21288
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English
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856c4c8d-8ed2-4d22-bdc0-79b62de8af4e (old id 8825202)
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2016-03-03 13:14:43
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@article{856c4c8d-8ed2-4d22-bdc0-79b62de8af4e,
  abstract     = {Neutrophils are critical for the control of bacterial infections, but they may also contribute to disease pathology. Here we explore neutrophil responses, in particular the release of sepsis-associated factors heparin-binding protein (HBP) and resistin in relation to specific bacterial stimuli and sepsis of varying aetiology. Analyses of HBP and resistin in plasma of septic patients revealed elevated levels as compared to non-infected critically ill patients. HBP and resistin correlated significantly in septic patients, with the strongest association seen in group A streptococcal (GAS) cases. In vitro stimulation of human neutrophils revealed that fixed streptococcal strains induced significantly higher release of HBP and resistin, as compared to Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. Similarly, neutrophils stimulated with the streptococcal M1-protein showed a significant increase in co-localization of HBP and resistin positive granules as well as exocytosis of these factors, as compared to LPS. Using a GAS strain deficient in M1-protein expression had negligible effect on neutrophil activation, while a strain deficient in the stand-alone regulator MsmR was significantly less stimulatory as compared to its wild type strain. Taken together, the findings suggest that the streptococcal activation of neutrophils is multifactorial and involves, but is not limited to, proteins encoded by the FCT-locus.},
  articleno    = {21288},
  author       = {Snäll, Johanna and Linnér, Anna and Uhlmann, Julia and Siemens, Nikolai and Ibold, Heike and Janos, Marton and Linder, Adam and Kreikemeyer, Bernd and Herwald, Heiko and Johansson, Linda and Norrby-Teglund, Anna},
  issn         = {2045-2322},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Scientific Reports},
  title        = {Differential neutrophil responses to bacterial stimuli: Streptococcal strains are potent inducers of heparin-binding protein and resistin-release.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep21288},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}