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Aspiration as a late complication after accelerated versus conventional radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.

Lindblom, Ulrika LU ; Nilsson, Per LU ; Gärskog, Ola; Kjellén, Elisabeth LU ; Laurell, Göran; Wahlberg, Peter LU ; Zackrisson, Björn and Levring Jäghagen, Eva (2016) In Acta Oto-Laryngologica 136(3). p.304-311
Abstract
Conclusion Neck dissection after radiotherapy increased the risk of aspiration as a late effect in a sub-sample of patients treated for head and neck cancer in the ARTSCAN study. Patients treated with accelerated fractionation (AF) developed aspiration, with or without coughing, more frequently than patients treated with conventional fractionation (CF). Objectives A long-term follow-up study was conducted to determine the frequency of aspiration as a late effect in patients with head and neck cancer treated with AF or CF. Method One-hundred and eight patients were recruited from two centres of the Swedish multi-centre study, ARTSCAN, where AF and CF were compared. Patients with positive lymph nodes were treated with neck dissection after... (More)
Conclusion Neck dissection after radiotherapy increased the risk of aspiration as a late effect in a sub-sample of patients treated for head and neck cancer in the ARTSCAN study. Patients treated with accelerated fractionation (AF) developed aspiration, with or without coughing, more frequently than patients treated with conventional fractionation (CF). Objectives A long-term follow-up study was conducted to determine the frequency of aspiration as a late effect in patients with head and neck cancer treated with AF or CF. Method One-hundred and eight patients were recruited from two centres of the Swedish multi-centre study, ARTSCAN, where AF and CF were compared. Patients with positive lymph nodes were treated with neck dissection after completing radiotherapy. The follow-up was performed at a median of 65 months after initiation of radiotherapy and included an ENT and a videofluoroscopic examination. Results Aspiration was found in 51/108 (47%) and silent aspiration in 34/96 (35%) patients. Neck dissection (n = 47 patients) was significantly associated with both aspiration and silent aspiration. Aspiration was more common among patients treated with AF (34/61; 56%) compared to CF (17/47; 36%; p = 0.053). Silent aspiration was also more common after AF (24/54; 44%) than after CF (10/42; 24%; p = 0.052). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oto-Laryngologica
volume
136
issue
3
pages
304 - 311
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:26838580
  • scopus:84956950560
  • wos:000375933300017
ISSN
1651-2251
DOI
10.3109/00016489.2015.1113439
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2e67a7e6-4925-4ba7-aa18-df9c8e6bc98f (old id 8829440)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26838580?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-01 14:01:40
date last changed
2017-03-05 03:59:14
@article{2e67a7e6-4925-4ba7-aa18-df9c8e6bc98f,
  abstract     = {Conclusion Neck dissection after radiotherapy increased the risk of aspiration as a late effect in a sub-sample of patients treated for head and neck cancer in the ARTSCAN study. Patients treated with accelerated fractionation (AF) developed aspiration, with or without coughing, more frequently than patients treated with conventional fractionation (CF). Objectives A long-term follow-up study was conducted to determine the frequency of aspiration as a late effect in patients with head and neck cancer treated with AF or CF. Method One-hundred and eight patients were recruited from two centres of the Swedish multi-centre study, ARTSCAN, where AF and CF were compared. Patients with positive lymph nodes were treated with neck dissection after completing radiotherapy. The follow-up was performed at a median of 65 months after initiation of radiotherapy and included an ENT and a videofluoroscopic examination. Results Aspiration was found in 51/108 (47%) and silent aspiration in 34/96 (35%) patients. Neck dissection (n = 47 patients) was significantly associated with both aspiration and silent aspiration. Aspiration was more common among patients treated with AF (34/61; 56%) compared to CF (17/47; 36%; p = 0.053). Silent aspiration was also more common after AF (24/54; 44%) than after CF (10/42; 24%; p = 0.052).},
  author       = {Lindblom, Ulrika and Nilsson, Per and Gärskog, Ola and Kjellén, Elisabeth and Laurell, Göran and Wahlberg, Peter and Zackrisson, Björn and Levring Jäghagen, Eva},
  issn         = {1651-2251},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {304--311},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oto-Laryngologica},
  title        = {Aspiration as a late complication after accelerated versus conventional radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2015.1113439},
  volume       = {136},
  year         = {2016},
}