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Androgen Receptor Genotype in Humans and Susceptibility to Endocrine Disruptors.

Giwercman, Yvonne LU (2016) In Hormone Research in Paediatrics
Abstract
Although animal studies have raised concern that the influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds would obstruct the development of the male reproductive system, in general, exposure levels far above those found in humans have been needed to induce reproductive toxicity in animal models. Human data are inconclusive and have evoked the question whether endocrine-disrupting compounds can have any impact on hormonal function and thus health consequences when natural hormones are present. Indeed, many contaminants with hormone-like activity are much less potent than endogenous hormones themselves: 17β-oestradiol was, for instance, estimated to be 17,000 times more potent than o,p'-DDT. However, humans are exposed to a multitude of agents, and... (More)
Although animal studies have raised concern that the influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds would obstruct the development of the male reproductive system, in general, exposure levels far above those found in humans have been needed to induce reproductive toxicity in animal models. Human data are inconclusive and have evoked the question whether endocrine-disrupting compounds can have any impact on hormonal function and thus health consequences when natural hormones are present. Indeed, many contaminants with hormone-like activity are much less potent than endogenous hormones themselves: 17β-oestradiol was, for instance, estimated to be 17,000 times more potent than o,p'-DDT. However, humans are exposed to a multitude of agents, and when present in sufficient number and concentration, they might in principle act collected on the actions of endogenous hormones. Whether such effects will be physiologically relevant is still not known. Nevertheless, in the worst-case scenario, there are no threshold levels below which there are no effects at all, and one target molecule is the androgen receptor. This mini review focuses on the androgen receptor gene, its link with classical endocrine disruptors and smoking, and how common genetic variants in the androgen receptor gene may influence physiological outcomes. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Hormone Research in Paediatrics
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:26829394
  • scopus:84957718761
  • wos:000388734000007
ISSN
1663-2826
DOI
10.1159/000443686
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b51b2baf-4cec-4600-8d56-affa42b4cd89 (old id 8830135)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26829394?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-01 10:38:20
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:16:20
@article{b51b2baf-4cec-4600-8d56-affa42b4cd89,
  abstract     = {Although animal studies have raised concern that the influence of endocrine-disrupting compounds would obstruct the development of the male reproductive system, in general, exposure levels far above those found in humans have been needed to induce reproductive toxicity in animal models. Human data are inconclusive and have evoked the question whether endocrine-disrupting compounds can have any impact on hormonal function and thus health consequences when natural hormones are present. Indeed, many contaminants with hormone-like activity are much less potent than endogenous hormones themselves: 17β-oestradiol was, for instance, estimated to be 17,000 times more potent than o,p'-DDT. However, humans are exposed to a multitude of agents, and when present in sufficient number and concentration, they might in principle act collected on the actions of endogenous hormones. Whether such effects will be physiologically relevant is still not known. Nevertheless, in the worst-case scenario, there are no threshold levels below which there are no effects at all, and one target molecule is the androgen receptor. This mini review focuses on the androgen receptor gene, its link with classical endocrine disruptors and smoking, and how common genetic variants in the androgen receptor gene may influence physiological outcomes.},
  author       = {Giwercman, Yvonne},
  issn         = {1663-2826},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Hormone Research in Paediatrics},
  title        = {Androgen Receptor Genotype in Humans and Susceptibility to Endocrine Disruptors.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000443686},
  year         = {2016},
}